Posts Tagged ‘Yemen’

The dark clouds of Islamic-fascistic “democracy” (‘non-Muslims’ Winter’)

November 29, 2011

The dark clouds of Islamic-fascistic “democracy” (‘non-Muslims’ Winter’)


Egypt’s Coptic Christians Fear Fewer Rights After Elections | News …
With Islamist groups expected to do well in Egypt’s parliamentary elections, many Coptic Christians are concerned that their limited rights will ..
http://www.voanews.com/english/news/middle-east/Egypts-Coptic-Christians-Fear-Fewer-Rights-After-Ele ctions-134663563.html


Egyptian elections stir disquiet in Israel
(CSmonitor 29, Nov, 2011)
The Arab Spring could open the door for Islamists – as seen in Egypt elections – and threaten Israel,…
http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle-East/2011/1129/Egyptian-elections-stir-disquiet-in-Israel


Democracy Question Remains Amid Arab Revolution ‎ Christian Broadcasting Network – Gary Lane – Tuesday, November 29, 2011
But with uprisings in places like Egypt, Yemen and Syria, the question remains of whether the revolution result in democracy or radical Islamic rule.
http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/world/2011/November/Democracy-Question-Remains-Amid-Arab-Revolution-/


Moroccan wolf in sheep’s clothing
Jerusalem Post – Jonathan D. Halevi (11/28/2011)
The writer is a senior researcher of the Middle East and radical Islam at the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs (JCPA) and a former advisor to the Policy …
http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Op-EdContributors/Article.aspx?id=247340


Lebanon Maronite Church patriarch fears Arab Spring … –
2 Nov 2011 – The head of Lebanon’s Maronite church said he feared for the fate of Christians in the Middle East if the Arab Spring brought “radical groups” to …
http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2011/11/02/lebanon-maronite-church-patriarch-fears-arab-spring-e xtremism/


Christian minorities fear Arab Spring may threaten their existence
11 Oct 2011 – The rapid transformation in the Arab region – the result of popular rejection of authoritarian regimes – has raised fears among Christian …
http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en/node/504107


Arab Minorities in Fear of Arab Spring | Spirituality Ireland Blogs
http://spiritualityireland.org/blog/index.php/2011/10/arab-minorities-in-fear-of-arab-spring


Arab Minorities in Fear of Arab Spring. Posted on October 28, 2011 by Danny Pio . Last week saw Coptic orthodox Christians in Ireland rallying outside the Dáil …
In the Arab Spring, Christians Fear Religious Freeze – Christian
http://www.christianity.com/11647581/

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Islamofascism, the Internet, and the liberty contagion

February 23, 2011

Islamofascism, the Internet, and the liberty contagion | Richmond Times-Dispatch

By ROSS MACKENZIE
Published: February 20, 2011

On Egypt et al. let us be very clear.

Joy at the expansion of liberty — maybe even of democracy — is the only defensible sentiment. Any policy based on regime stability alone (as American foreign policy has been based too long) and thereby sanctioning tyranny, autocracy, one-party rule — is based on a premise not only indefensible but false.

The American left went bonkers over George W. Bush’s “Freedom Agenda,” which morphed into a “Freedom Doctrine.” Much of the left never accepted Bush as a legitimate president following the Supreme Court’s ruling about the Florida count in the 2000 election — and so the left could not accept anything he did. Yet it was he who insisted on encouraging democracy to germinate and grow in Iraq, in the hope it might spread throughout the Middle East.

So here we are, with freedom demonstrations from the southern Mediterranean littoral to beyond the Persian Gulf in, even, Iran. Is this apparent contagion a consequence — in a paradigmatic Internet hour — of infectious liberty, and correspondingly eloquent testimony to the fragility of autocratic regimes both Arab and Persian? At almost light-speed, the Internet may have disassembled fascist mullah rule across the Muslim world. Can you not hear — in the streets from Algiers to Tehran — liberty’s alluring song?

Maybe. And maybe not.

Islamofascism is our century’s Soviet communism. It seeks worldwide rule (a global caliphate) achieved and sustained through terror. In Iran, during the Carter administration, the shah fell. Freedom was thick in the air. Then Khomeini took over. Today freedom lies crushed, al-Qaida and the Taliban have sprouted, and Iran has satellized first Gaza (through Hamas) and now Lebanon (through Hezbollah). Syria remains in Iran’s orbit, and Turkey nudges seemingly ever closer.

Now in Egypt, during an Obama administration boasting a foreign policy no less befuddled, ideological, and incompetent than Carter’s, Mubarak is out. Were the Tahrir Square demonstrations genuinely spontaneous? Did his fall just happen, the demonstrators emboldened and enabled by the Internet? Or were those at Tahrir mere marionettes manipulated by an Islamofascist Muslim Brotherhood?

The ‘Hood traces back to a late 1920s founding and to early training by Nazi goons. Many of its alumni are — or were — al-Qaida stars. It helped establish Hamas, which it and Iran still sustain. The ‘Hood’s Supreme Guide, one Mohamed Badi, insists his group will “continue to raise the banner of jihad” against Jews — in his words the ‘Hood’s “first and foremost enemies.” He hates America, signifies for targeting U.S. troops, deplores “Zio-American arrogance and tyranny,” and seeks for Egypt creation of an Islamist state.

Such lovelies could have arranged the demonstrations in Cairo and across the Muslim world. Or they may have been as surprised by those demonstrations as the Obamians were. In either case, as Egypt’s most efficient, disciplined, and stabilizing (there’s that word again) force besides the military, the Muslim Brotherhood may be perfectly positioned to satellize Egypt — thereby advancing the Islamist territorial imperative, not to mention the Iranian dream.

Perhaps it’s true: The Internet may be a liberating tool unimagined just a generation ago. In its face, possibly not even the most ruthless of regimes can survive. Or perhaps in liberating a people subjugated in poverty (at $6,200 per year, per-capita Egyptian income ranks behind Bosnia, Jamaica and Cuba), the Internet liberates only to invite more terrifying subjugation by Islamist cut-throats — as with communist cadres — waiting to rush from the shadows into the corridors of power.

Liberty is of course the ultimate cause. Always. Before our eyes, we may be seeing it blossom — so greatly fertilized by the Internet — throughout the Muslim world. Then again, terrorizing Islamists may move in and capture these revolutions, converting them at the muzzles of guns, Maoist-like, into perversions of democracy that allow one man one vote — once.

That would be the worst sort of outcome. Still, it would enable a blame-mongering American left to unload once again on George Bush, its perceived illegitimate president who planted freedom in the Muslim world, for the perverted, illegitimate democracy his “Freedom Agenda” ultimately wrought.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/news/2011/feb/20/tdopin02-islamofascism-the-internet-and-the-libert-ar-853882/

Update on ‘Turmoil on oppressive Arab-Muslim M.E.’ Feb. 16, 2011

February 16, 2011

Turmoil in the Middle East since January, 2011, starting off with Tunisia.
(a)In Egypt, at the beginning of February, the ‘Muslim Brotherhood’ tries to hijack the “revolution,” * calling for war with Israel *.

(b) Some US journalists are severely beaten, accused of being “Israeli spies.”* Some terrorism also reported there.*
(c) At the celebration of the fall of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, a racist Arab Muslim mob of 200 attacked and sexually assaulted CBS’ 60 Minutes reporter Lara Logan, while yelling “Jew!, Jew!”*

(d) Protests spread to other oppressive dictatorship in the Arab-Muslim Middle East such as: Iran, Syria, Yemen, Libya, Bahrain, etc.* Iranian Islamic Republic [typically] cracks down with harsh brutality.*

Egyptian protester: We don’t want Muslim Brotherhood to ‘hijack’ our protests

Kerry Picket
Published on February 3, 2011

The protests in Egypt have become more intense as acts of violence by pro-Mubarak have reportedly infiltrated the massive gathering of individuals speaking out against the Hosni Mubarak government. I interviewed a young Egyptian protester by phone on Wednesday. Cynthia Farahat is an Egyptian dissident who described herself as a “conservative in the American sense of the word.” She told me that supporters of Mubarak are stirring up violence by assaulting those who are protesting the government.

“I had joined the protest myself, and I have seen an extraordinary display of peace and civility that I never expected to see in a third world in Arab Islamic country. I was overwhelmed by the display of peaceful protesters and the tolerance. It was actually amazing,” she explained.

“My friends are there. Mubarak’s side attacked them today. I couldn’t get to Tahrir. I tried to go but, they closed all entrances to Tahrir Square, and many of my friends said because I am a girl and I have a political history, I might be targeted there. So they refused to let me go, but they are being attacked right now, and some people called me with Molotov cocktails [who are] Mubarak supporters,” she said.

“Most of these people are policemen. They are secret police. They caught them. They checked their IDs. Some of them of course not all of them,” she said. ” They were handed to the military who kept them in a government building until they can do something about it.”

It seems the Muslim Brotherhood wasted no time in taking advantage of the chaos in Egypt right now. It was difficult at first to see who was fueling the protests, as Brotherhood supporters were apparently small in numbers in the street protests but their long-time organized influenced, despite their opposition to the Mubarak, behind the scenes at higher levels remains a concern on Capitol Hill.

“My worry is that [the Muslim Brotherhood] are a very large organization and they could be exercising a more influence than what you see in front of the CNN cameras. It’s an organization that’s spawned three other terrorist organizations–Islamic Jihad, Al-Qaeda, and Hamas,” Senator Mark Kirk, Illinois Republican, told me on Wednesday night. “We don’t know the names of the leaders as well as we should, which is why I gave the speech on the floor–to go through who the top leader of guidance is and then what he said about the West and Sharia law.”

“[The Muslim Brotherhood] was one of my major concerns. When the 25th of January protests started, I was,ironically, one of the people who were very apprehensive about it and not encouraging it in anyway, because the media was everywhere, and the West and in Egypt were trying to portray it as a movement that was coming out of Islamists,” said Cynthia. So I was among the people who refused to go on the first days. I was very apprehensive about the nature of these protests. Later, my perspective completely changed, because I have seen video of my friends and my colleagues protesting. The Muslim Brotherhood had a very insignificant almost no presence in the protest at all.”

Ms. Farahat added that not only was the Brotherhood small in numbers but were also rejected by protesters she saw.

“The Muslim Brotherhood, and I saw it the other day—I was watching, they tried to recite the slogan ‘Islam is the solution, and they were attacked by the rest of the protesters and forced to shut-up. They were just asked to shut-up. It wasn’t about the Muslim Brotherhood. [The protesters] were not going to allow [the Brotherhood] to hijack the diverse event.”

Ms. Farahat believes opposition groups like the Muslim Brotherhood, which was organized in 1928 and known to have ties to groups engaging in terrorist activity, are not popular in Egypt.

“When a few of the Islamic crowds try to break the protests to pray theywere rejected by the rest of the protesters. Rejecting a prayer is a very unusual sight in an Islamic country. The protesters sort of look at the Muslim Brotherhood as part of the opposition of Mubarak’s regime,” she explained.

“The significant thing is the opposition is almost totally rejected by most of the protesters, and they are seen as players with the Mubarak regime. That’s why they are refused any conversation or any dialogue with the new vice president Omar Suleiman…because they are trying to gain popularity among the masses .”

However, Senator Kirk cautions that history shows the power that eventually takes over the environment seen in Egypt today is usually absent among the crowds of people making demands in the streets.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/blog/watercooler/2011/feb/3/egyptian-protester-we-dont-want-muslim-brotherhood/

Jerusalem Issue Briefs-The Muslim Brotherhood and the Egyptian Crisis

The Muslim Brotherhood and the Egyptian Crisis

Dore Gold

[Vol. 10, No. 26 2 February 2011]

  • Will the Obama administration's policy toward Egypt be based on a perception that the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood would be extremely dangerous? Or have they taken the position – voiced in parts of the U.S. foreign policy establishment – that the Brotherhood has become moderate and can be talked to? Initial administration reactions indicate that it does not rule out Muslim Brotherhood participation in a future Egyptian coalition government.
  • Since January 28, the Muslim Brotherhood's involvement has become more prominent, with its support of Mohamed ElBaradei to lead the opposition forces against the government. In the streets of Cairo, Muslim Brotherhood demonstrators disdainfully call people like ElBaradei “donkeys of the revolution” (hamir al-thawra) – to be used and thenpushed away – a scenario that sees the Muslim Brotherhoodexploit ElBaradei in order to hijack the Egyptian revolution at a later stage.
  • There has been a great deal of confusion about the Muslim Brotherhood.In the years after it was founded in 1928, it developed a “secret apparatus” that engaged in political terrorism against Egyptian Copts as well as government officials. In December 1948, the Muslim Brotherhood assassinated Egyptian Prime Minister Mahmoud al-Nuqrashi Pasha. It also sought to kill Egyptian leader Abdul Nasser in October 1954.
  • Former Brotherhood Supreme Guide Muhammad Akef declared in 2004 his “complete faith that Islam will invade Europe and America.” In 2001, the Muslim Brotherhood's publication in London, Risalat al-Ikhwan, featured at the top of its cover page the slogan: “Our Mission: World Domination.” This header was changed after 9/11.
  • The current Supreme Guide, Muhammad Badi', gave a sermon in September 2010 stating that “the improvement and change that the [Muslim] nation seeks can only be attained through jihad and sacrifice and by raising a jihadi generation that pursues death, just as the enemies pursue life.”

Initially, it was widely observed that the Muslim Brotherhood has been very low-key during the current crisis in Egypt. Most analysts admitted that it is the best organized and largest opposition group in Egypt, but they played down its role. Yet since January 28, the Muslim Brotherhood's involvement has become more prominent.  One tangible example is the support the Brotherhood has given to Mohamed ElBaradei to lead the opposition forces against the government.

In the streets of Cairo, Muslim Brotherhood demonstrators disdainfully call people like ElBaradei “donkeys of the revolution” (hamir al-thawra), to be used and then pushed away.1 Thus, there is a scenario that sees the Muslim Brotherhood exploit a figure like ElBaradei in order to hijack the Egyptian revolution at a later stage.

What is the Muslim Brotherhood? It is known as Ikhwan al-Muslimun in Arabic, or just Ikhwan, established in 1928 by an Egyptian schoolteacher, Hassan al-Banna. Outwardly, it was a social and religious organization, but over the years it developed a “secret apparatus” that engaged in military training of its cadres and political terrorism against Egyptian Copts as well as government officials. This dualism continued years later. In December 1948, the Muslim Brotherhood assassinated Egyptian Prime Minister Mahmoud al-Nuqrashi Pasha. It also sought to kill Egyptian leader Abdul Nasser in October 1954.

The Muslim Brotherhood also had an expansionist agenda right from the start, and called for the re-establishment of the Islamic Empire. In the late 1930s, its newspaper called for retaking “former Islamic colonies” in Andalus (Spain), southern Italy, and the Balkans.2 This theme was maintained in recent years by its former Supreme Guide, Muhammad Akef, who in 2004 declared his “complete faith that Islam will invade Europe and America,” with the caveat that Westerners will join Islam by conviction.3 Others have also made this point. According to Sheikh Yousef Qaradawi, widely regarded as the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood:

Constantinople was conquered in 1453 by a 23-year-old Ottoman named Muhammad ibn Murad, whom we call Muhammad the Conqueror. Now what remains is to conquer Rome. That is what we wish for, and that is what we believe in. After having been expelled twice, Islam will be victorious and reconquer Europe….I am certain that this time, victory will be won not by the sword but by preaching.4

Over the years, the Muslim Brotherhood opened branches in a number of Arab countries and even has front organizations in the UK, France, and the U.S. But it has not disavowed its original commitment to Islamic militancy and its global ambitions. For example, the Muslim Brotherhood's publication in London, Risalat al-Ikhwan, has maintained a clearly jihadist orientation; in 2001 it featured at the top of its cover page the slogan: “Our Mission: World Domination” (siyadat al-dunya). This header was changed after 9/11, but the publication still carries the Muslim Brotherhood's motto which includes: “Jihad is our path; martyrdom is our aspiration.”5

The current Supreme Guide of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Muhammad Badi', gave a sermon in September 2010 stating that Muslims today “need to understand that the improvement and change that the [Muslim] nation seeks can only be attained through jihad and sacrifice and by raising a jihadi generation that pursues death, just as the enemies pursue life.”6 In short, the Muslim Brotherhood remains committed to supporting militant activities in order to advance its political aims. From looking at the biographies of its most prominent graduates, one can immediately understand the organization's long-term commitment to jihadism:

1.     Abdullah Azzam (of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood) and Muhammad Qutb (of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood) taught at King Abdul Aziz University in Jidda, Saudi Arabia, where they had a student named Osama bin Laden. Azzam went off to Pakistan with his student, bin Laden, to help the mujahidin fight the Soviets in Afghanistan.

2.     Ayman al-Zawahiri (bin Laden's deputy) grew up in the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood.

3.     Khalid Sheikh Muhammad (the al-Qaeda mastermind of the 9/11 attacks) came out of the Kuwaiti Muslim Brotherhood.

Given this background, the Muslim Brotherhood has been widely regarded in the Arab world as the incubator of the jihadist ideology.  A former Kuwaiti Minister of Education, Dr. Ahmad Al-Rab'i, argued in Al-Sharq al-Awsat on July 25, 2005, that the founders of most modern terrorist groups in the Middle East emerged from “the mantle” of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Many columnists in the Middle East have warned in recent years about the Brotherhood's hostile intentions. Tariq Hasan, a columnist for the Egyptian government daily Al-Ahram, alerted his readers on June 23, 2007, that the Muslim Brotherhood was preparing a violent takeover in Egypt, using its “masked militias” in order to replicate the Hamas seizure of power in the Gaza Strip. And columnist Hussein Shobokshi, writing in the Saudi-owned Al-Sharq al-Awsat on October 23, 2007, said that “to this day” the Muslim Brotherhood “has brought nothing but fanaticism, divisions, and extremism, and in some cases bloodshed and killings.” Thus, both Arab regimes and leading opinion-makers in Arab states still have serious reservations about the claim of a new moderation in the Muslim Brotherhood.7

Ironically, in the last five years, prominent voices in the West have considered opening a political dialogue with the Muslim Brotherhood. For example, Dr. Robert S. Leiken and Steven Brooke published an article in the March-April 2007 issue of Foreign Affairs called “The Moderate Muslim Brotherhood” in which they advised the Bush administration to enter into a strategic alliance with the organization, which they referred to as “moderate,” calling it a “notable opportunity” to use the Brotherhood to promote American interests. James Traub echoed many of their arguments in the New York Times Magazine on April 29, 2007, in which he claimed that “the Muslim Brotherhood, for all its rhetorical support of Hamas, could well be precisely the kind of moderate Islamic body that the administration says it seeks.” In addition, a committee in the British House of Commons also advocated the UK opening a dialogue with the Muslim Brotherhood, as well.

At the same time, some U.S. officials and dignitaries seemed to have softened their approach to the Muslim Brotherhood. In 2005, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice pressed President Mubarak to open up participation in the Egyptian parliamentary elections, resulting in a major increase of elected Muslim Brotherhood members from 15 to 88. Subsequently, Mubarak became more reluctant to take U.S. advice.

Visiting U.S. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer met twice in 2007 with the head of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood's parliamentary bloc, Mohammed Saad el-Katatni, according to Brotherhood spokesman Hamdi Hassan.

The critical question is whether the Obama administration's policy toward Egypt will be based on a perception that the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood would be extremely dangerous. Or have they taken the position – voiced in parts of the U.S. foreign policy establishment – that the Muslim Brotherhood has become moderate and can be talked to? The initial reactions of the Obama administration indicate that it does not rule out Muslim Brotherhood participation in a future Egyptian coalition government.8 Unfortunately, there is a dangerous misconception about the Muslim Brotherhood in parts of the foreign policy community in the West that could affect calculations in Washington and London in the weeks ahead.
http://www.jcpa.org/JCPA/Templates/ShowPage.asp?DBID=1&LNGID=1&TMID=111&FID=442&PID=0&IID=5953

Muslim Brotherhood: ‘Prepare Egyptians for War With Israel’ Feb 1, 2011 … A leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt told the Arabic-language Iranian news network Al-Alam on Monday that he would like to …

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/Muslim-Brotherhood-war-Israel/2011/02/01/id/384603

Muslim Brotherhood Wants War With Israel – Forex Crunch Jan 31, 2011 … Mohamed Ghanem, one of the leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, calls Egypt to stop pumping gas to Israel and prepare the Egyptian …

http://www.forexcrunch.com/muslim-brotherhood-wants-war-with-israel/

“Severely Beaten” Fox News Reporters Were Accused Of Being Israeli Spies… Feb 3, 2011 … Now a source close to the network has told The Wrap that the pair was attacked because they were accused of being Israeli spies, and the two …

http://www.businessinsider.com/fox-news-reporter-israeli-spies-mubarak-cairo-video-2011-2

Injured Fox News Reporters Accused of Being ‘Israeli Spies’ in …Feb 3, 2011 … Injured Fox News Reporters Accused of Being ‘Israeli Spies’ in Egypt … and ran right into the pro Mubarak crowd and were severely beaten. …

http://tv.msn.com/tv/article.aspx?news=626798&affid=100055

CBS News reporter Lara Logan beaten, sexually assaulted during Cairo celebration



By Paul Farhi

Washington Post Staff Writer

Tuesday, February 15, 2011; 8:37 PM



CBS News said in a statement Logan was covering the celebrations for CBS’s “60 Minutes” program on February 11 when she and her team were surrounded by “a mob of more than 200 people whipped into a frenzy.”
“In the crush of the mob, she was separated from her crew. She was surrounded and suffered a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating before being saved by a group of women and an estimated 20 Egyptian soldiers,” CBS said.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/15/us-egypt-journalists-idUSTRE71E76I20110215



CBS reporter’s Cairo nightmare – NYPOST.com

Feb 16, 2011 … “60 Minutes” correspondent Lara Logan was repeatedly sexually assaulted by thugs yelling, “Jew! Jew!” as she covered the chaotic fall of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo’s main square Friday.
http://www.nypost.com/p/news/international/cbs_reporter_cairo_nightmare_pXiUVvhwIDdCrbD95ybD5N



Egyptians Yelled ‘Jew! Jew!’ While Sexually Assaulting CBS …Feb 16, 2011 …
“60 Minutes” correspondent Lara Logan was repeatedly sexually assaulted by thugs yelling, “Jew! Jew!” as she covered the chaotic fall of Egyptian President

http://nation.foxnews.com/lara-logan/2011/02/16/egyptians-yelled-jew-jew-while-sexually-assaulting-cbs-reporter-lara-logan

CBS Reporter Sexually Assaulted In Egypt
February, 16, 2011
Egypt – CBS reporter Lara Logan sustained a “brutal and sustained” sexual assault by an Egyptian mob of men while covering the protests in Cairo. …News One

http://newsone.com/world/newsonestaff2/cbs-lara-logan-raped-Egypt/


Prison break, looting, violence in Cairo as anti-government …‎
Herald Sun – Jan 30, 2011
Three other people were killed on Saturday in Cairo, three in Rafah on the border with Gaza, and five in Ismailia, on the west bank of the Suez Canal.
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/world/looting-engulfs-cairo/story-e6frf7lf-1225997039828


Egypt shuts Gaza border as militants break out of jail‎
Reuters – Nidal al-Mughrabi – Ori Lewis – Jan 30, 2011
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/01/30/uk-palestinians-egypt-gaza-idUKTRE70T35I20110130


Egyptian anti-government demonstrators face army tanks on Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Feb 5.
Egypt ruling party leaders resign
Blast rocks gas terminal in Sinai


[…]
Blast
An explosion rocked a gas terminal in Egypt’s northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, setting off a massive fire that was contained by shutting off the flow of gas to neighboring Jordan and Israel, officials and witnesses said.
Egypt’s natural gas company said the fire was caused by a gas leak. However, a local security official said an explosive device was detonated inside the terminal, and the regional governor, Abdel Wahab Mabrouk, said he suspected sabotage.
The blast and fire at the gas terminal in the Sinai town of El-Arish did not cause casualties. The explosion sent a pillar of flames leaping into the sky, but was a safe distance from the nearest homes, said Mabrouk.
The blast came as a popular uprising engulfed Egypt, where anti-government protesters have been demanding the ouster of longtime President Hosni Mubarak for the past two weeks. The Sinai Peninsula, home to Bedouin tribesmen, has been the scene of clashes between residents and security forces. It borders both Israel and the Gaza Strip, ruled by the Islamic militant Hamas.
The terminal is part of a pipeline system that transports gas from Egypt’s Port Said on the Mediterranean Sea to Israel, Syria and Jordan.
The head of Egypt’s natural gas company, Magdy Toufik, said in a statement that the fire broke out in the terminal “as a result of a small amount of gas leaking.”
However, a senior security official said an explosive device was detonated in the terminal. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the issue with reporters.
[…]


Church
A Coptic church in the Egyptian town of Rafah bordering the Gaza Strip was in flames on Saturday, with witnesses reporting a blast although a local official denied an explosion was the cause.
Witnesses said they saw flames coming out of the Mar Girgis church in Rafah after hearing an explosion. Armed men on motorbikes were spotted near the church, one of them said.
North Sinai’s governor Abdel Wahab Mabruk, however, denied on state television there had been any explosion in Mar Girgis.
The church had been left without police guards at the time of the fire, witnesses said, after security forces disappeared en masse amid nationwide rallies calling for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak.
Security is usually in place around Christian places of worship after several attacks against Copts and had been boosted after a bombing in Alexandria at the turn of the year.
http://www.arabtimesonline.com/NewsDetails/tabid/96/smid/414/ArticleID/165225/t/Egypt-ruling-party-leaders-resign/Default.aspx




Arab states rocked by the mouse that roared‎
Sydney Morning Herald – Jan 21, 2011


… in communist regimes or ossified dictatorships like Syria and Tunisia”. ….the oppressed locals… Iraq and Afghanistan have proved that invasion is a costly and difficult way to effect change. As they stand today, the MENA countries reveal that cozying up to despots and writing billion-dollar cheques for those that don’t have the people’s oil to steal, creates more problems than it solves for the reformist-minded. Inevitably, change must come from within but the oppressed should not be made to fight with one hand tied behind their backs, with Washington and other foreign capitals turning their backs because of their own vested interest.


The Egyptian-born writer Mona Eltahawy is eloquent on this: “Not once in my 43 years have I thought that I’d see an Arab leader toppled by his people. It is nothing short of poetic justice that it was neither Islamists nor invasion-in-the-name-of-democracy that sent the waters rushing on to Ben Ali’s ship but, rather, the youth of his country.”
http://www.smh.com.au/world/arab-states-rocked-by-the-mouse-that-roared-20110121-19zyo.html?from=smh_sb


As Egypt uprising inspires Middle East, Iran sees biggest protests …
February 14, 2011
By Thomas Erdbrink and Liz Sly TEHRAN – Violent protests erupted in Iran, Yemen and Bahrain on Monday as the revolutionary fervor unleashed by the toppling …
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/14/AR2011021405301.html?hpid=topnews


Quest for human dignity drives unrest in Mideast‎
Honolulu Star-Advertiser – Ira Zunin – 12 February 2011


Within days protests began in Yemen, Jordan, Algeria, Bahrain and Libya. Syria is on edge…
 totalitarian figures who might be made into reliable, sovereign allies but who are also oppressive to their own people.
http://www.staradvertiser.com/columnists/healthandmoney/20110212_quest_for_human_dignity_drives_unrest_in_mideast.html


Middle East/N. Africa | Human Rights Watch
Feb 15, 2011 … Discrimination and Violence against Sexual Minorities in Iran … Bahraini authorities should order security forces to halt attacks on …
http://www.hrw.org/en/middle-east/n-africa


Live: Mid-East protests
Page last updated at 09:35 GMT, Wednesday, 16 February 2011


Libya, Bahrain and Iran are the latest countries to be hit by popular protests inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. Follow our minute-by-minute coverage of all the latest events across the Middle East and North Africa, where several regimes are facing huge challenges from their people.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/9399009.stm


Obama Warns Autocratic Rulers: ‘World Is Changing’‎


U.S. President Barack Obama has told ‘friend and foe alike’ that they need to listen to their citizens’ calls for democracy.
February 15, 2011
By Heather Maher
http://www.rferl.org/content/obama_warns_autocrats_world_is_changing/2310597.html



Protests broken up in Iran | euronews, world news
Feb 14, 2011
http://www.euronews.net/2011/02/14/protests-broken-up-in-iran/


Iran protests see reinvigorated activists take to the streets in …
Feb 14, 2011 … Riot police and basiji militia use teargas on protesters, with reports that one demonstrator was killed in clashes.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/14/iran-protests-reinvigorated-activists


Iran Cracks Down on Spiraling Protests | News | EnglishFeb 15, 2011 … State TV showed some 50 conservative MPs marching through parliament’s main hall on Tuesday, chanting ‘Death to Mousavi, death to Karroubi.’
http://www.voanews.com/english/news/Iran-Cracks-Down-on-Spiraling-Protests-116240014.html


Iranian lawmakers: Execute opposition leaders
[February 15, 2011]
 
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Hardline Iranian lawmakers called on Tuesday for the country’s opposition leaders to face trial and be put to death, a day after clashes between opposition protesters and security forces left two people dead and dozens injured.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2011-02-15-iran-reaction-protests_N.htm


Obama lashes out at Iranian protest crackdown | World | RIA Novosti
Feb 15, 2011 … U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday criticized Iranian leaders for a brutal crackdown on anti-government protesters and praised Egypt’s …
http://en.rian.ru/world/20110215/162621174.html


Iran’s Brutal Crackdown: Join the Live Chat
CNN (blog)


Posted: February 15th, 2011 09:47 PM ET
 
Tonight a 360° exclusive. You’ll hear from a protester in Iran who’s risking her life to speak out. The Iranian government is cracking down on the demonstrations following Egypt’s uprising. That’s after they praised the people of Egypt. We’re Keeping Them Honest.
http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/2011/02/15/irans-brutal-crackdown-join-the-live-chat/


Clashes at funeral of Iran protest victim: TV | World | DAWN.COM
Feb 16, 2011 … Dawn.com
http://www.dawn.com/2011/02/16/clashes-at-funeral-of-iran-protest-victim-tv.html


Iran Protests 2011: Dramatic Videos
Feb 14, 2011 … Following revolutionary protests in Egypt, Iranians have now also begun protesting, as thousands have taken to the streets.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/14/iran-protests-2011-videos_n_823162.html

LEADING APARTHEID AND OPPRESSOR OF THE WORLD SETS UP “HUMAN RIGHTS” DIV. [OIC], LOL

April 23, 2010

LEADING APARTHEID AND OPPRESSOR OF THE WORLD SETS UP “HUMAN RIGHTS” DIV. [OIC], LOL

This BITTER JOKE is in the news:
Major Muslim group sets up human rights division 22 Apr 2010
… The Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) has announced it is setting up a special division that will deal with human rights.

http://www.jpost.com/MiddleEast/Article.aspx?id=173731


The regionalization of minority rights is most advanced within the West, in Europe and the Americas, By contrast, there is virtually no enthusiasm in Asia or the Arab/Muslim world to defelop regional norms on minortitiy rights. The whole issue remains essentially a taboo topic in many Asian and Middle Eastern countries…. Interestingly, the Organization of the Islamic Conference, representing Muslim-majority countries around the world, has a Department on Minority Affairs, but its formal resolutions focus exclusively on the rights of Muslim minorities living in non-Muslim majority countries (Khan 2002). (For representative example, see the OIC’s resolution ‘On Safeguarding the Rights of Muslim Communites and Minorities in non-OIC Member States’– Resoliution No. 1/10-MM (IS) , adopted at the 10th Session of the Islamic Summit Conference, 16-17 October-2203). The OIC has not attempted to codify norms, or to establish formal monitoring mechanisms, regarding the treatment of ethnic minorities within Muslim-majority countries, such as the oppression of the Kurds in Syria, the Ahwaz in Iran, the Hazars in Afghanistan, the Baluchs in Pakistan,the ‘Al-Akhdam’ in Yemen, or the Berbers in Algeria.

http://books.google.com/books?id=yySlh_dSElQC&pg=PA308
OIC, World’s Leading Human Rights Violators, To Set Up Own Human rights division

http://atlasshrugs2000.typepad.com/atlas_shrugs/2010/03/oichuman-rights-commission-.html

Muslim Human Rights–A Record Incompatible with the Civilized World …5 Mar 2010 … Yet despite the documents’ lofty principles, the record shows the Arab world is one of the worst offenders in the field of human rights. …

http://bsimmons.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/muslim-human-rights-a-record-incompatible-with-the-civilized-world-very-long-but-very-important/

Muslim extremist up for human-rights post 20 Apr 2010 … The Islamic legal code is enforced by religious police in Saudi Arabia and … Department has cited as one of the world’s worst abusers of human rights. … records it possesses prove a connection between CAIR and Hamas. …

http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=143545

Last year International Christian Concern placed (Muslim) Eritrea at number nine in its annual Hall of Shame. According to the ICC the intensity of persecution was “high” and “increasing.” In the ICC’s report this year the group abandoned its attempt to rank persecutors, but again included Eritrea among the worst ten. Eritrea placed among the top four in intensity of persecution, along with North Korea, Saudi Arabia, and Somalia.
http://spectator.org/archives/2010/04/02/eritrea-doubly-evil

It’s something along the line of Libya (where 2 Million Africans are oppressed because of racism) & Iran (where everyone suffers under the Islamist boot, especially minorities have a “special” treatment from the bastion of “tolerance,” like: Bahai’, Christians, Jews, Azeris, Baluchis, Ahwazis, etc.) hosting a UN conference on racism…

Non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world [Racist Arabism and bigoted Islamism]

May 8, 2009

Non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world [Racist Arabism and bigoted Islamism]
eretzyisroel ^

Non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world

One key element missing from the discussion is the question of non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world. The Arab nationalists have succeeded in establishing some 23 non-democratic, ethnically (Arab) and religiously (Islam) defined nation-states in over 1 million square miles of territory, often at the expense of non-Arabs, such as the Kurds (Muslims, non-Arabs), Assyrians (Christians, non-Arabs), Copts (Christians, non-Arabs), southern Sudanese (Christian and pagan non-Arabs), Maronite Lebanese (Christian and mostly identified with their Phoenician ancestors) and Mizrahi Jews. Arab nationalist ideology claims all this territory exclusively as “Arab” despite the legitimate claims of non-Arabs and/or non-Muslims to ancient homelands long ago arabized with the spread of Islam, often through conquest.

I believe that the Arab opposition to the existence of non-Arab, non-Muslim Israel is based on the ideological motivations which led to the persecution of non-Arab minorities. The Assyrians suffered massacre and expulsion by the Arab nationalists of Iraq in the 1920s and 1930s. The Kurds have been persecuted and have suffered terribly for their struggle to establish an independent Kurdistan (at the hands of the Turks and Iranians as well, but that is another story.)

Arab nationalist ideology, and its Islamicist couterpart, cannot and will not tolerate non-Arab and non-Islamic peoples organizing themselves into their own independent nation states. Indeed, I have seen on Islamicist web sites the goal of “regaining” Spain in the name of Islam.

I believe that we need to place Israel’s struggle to survive into this context. Any non-Arab/non-Islamic state in the region must rely on strength (political, moral, spiritual and military) if it wants to survive in the Middle East. In this context can we thus place Israel’s demand for security. It is not security for the sake of security, not seucirty for the sake of oppressing another people, but security for the sake of survival against two racist and exclusivist ideologies (Arabism and Islamicism) which have succeeded in repressing the just struggles for national self-determination of most non-Arab peoples in the Middle East.

To this end, I highly recommend looking at the following web sites:

Assyrian Democratic MovementAssyrian International News Agency

Copts.Com

The World Lebanese Organization

Maronite Research Council

Kudistan web

http://www.eretzyisroel.org/~jkatz/nonarab.html

Al Jazeera = Example of Arab Racism

September 22, 2008

YouTube – aljazeera
channel is an example of racism in
the ARAB WORLD…

https://i1.wp.com/i3.ytimg.com/vi/JbQNZHwIDJU/default.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p94t2YkoGQo

This Arab admits on video that: “the Arabs are the most racist people in the world“.