Archive for April, 2011

Apartheid in Palestine – Censored by Wikipedia

April 28, 2011

Apartheid in Palestine – Censored by Wikipedia

by Spartacus on April 13, 2011

in Edit War,Editing on Wikipedia

This article was deleted by Wikipedia administrators.

Note: Wikibias received a hard copy of the article by an anonymous editor before it was deleted and made inaccessible from Wikipedia. This is the most recent draft of the article available prior to its deletion.

The Palestinian Authority’s treatment of the Christians, Jews, women, gays and the refugees of 1948 has been compared by United Nations investigators, human rights groups and critics of Israeli policy to South Africa’s treatment of non-whites during its apartheid era.

Public figures including Khaled Abu Toameh, Victor Davis Hanson, David Bedein and Alan Dershowitz have characterized the Palesitnian suthority of practicing “apartheid.”

Crime of Apartheid

In 1973, the International Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid (ICSPCA) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. The ICSPCA defines the crime of apartheidas “inhuman acts committed for the purpose of establishing and maintaining domination by one racial group … over another racial group … and systematically oppressing them.”

In 2002 the crime of apartheid was further defined by Article 7 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Courtas encompassing inhumane acts such as torture, murder, forcible transfer, imprisonment, or persecution of an identifiable group on political, racial, national, ethnic, cultural, religious, or other grounds, “committed in the context of an institutionalized regime of systematic oppression and domination by one racial group over any racial group or groups and committed with the intention of maintaining that regime.”

Apartheid against Christians

It is against the law share the Gospel with a Palestinian.

Professor Alan Dershowitz of Harvard University charges that “Hamas is notorious for its anti-Christian apartheid.”Under the Hamas-led government, anti=Christian apartheid has included bombings and attacks by gunmen on Christian individuals and institutions.

Journalist Khaled Abu Toameh describes the treatment of Christians living under the Palestinian Authority as a system of “apartheid”.

Apartheid against Ahmadi

Apostasy (conversion form Islam to another religion) is against the law in the Palestinian Authority. Penalties include forcible divorce (dissolution of the marriages of apostates) and the death penalty. Members of the minority Ahmadi Islamic sect are threatened with the death penalty due to court rulings that the sect is heretical.

Believers living in both the Palestinian Authority controlled West Bank and in Hamas controlled Gaza have been stripped of their property by legal action, beaten and had their property destroyed by thugs.

In Hamas-controlled Gaza

Alan Dershowitz accuses the Hamas government of Gaza as practicing “apartheid… against women, gays, Christians.”

Apartheid against Jews

The Palestinian Authority has been accused of being “an apartheid, racist, Palestinian state which openly and proudly states its intention of being Judenrein.”

Alan Dershowitz describes the Palestinian Authority’s policy statements that “‘no Jew’ will ever be allowed to live in a Palestinian state” as “apartheid”. Accusations that “apartheid” exists in “the territories currently occupied by the Fatah-controlled Palestinian Authority and the Hamas-occupied Gaza Strip” on the gorunds that the “Palestinian Arabs ban all Jews from living amongst them” and “Arabs found to have sold property to Jewish purchasers are summarily executed – often in the public squares and streets of Palestinian Arab settlements. And on the grounds that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas has declared that:

“I will never allow a single Israeli to live among us on Palestinian land.”

Since its inception in 1994, the newly constituted Palestinian Authority, created by the PLO, has prepared the rudiments of a Palestinian State, modeled on the rules of Apartheid and institutionalized discrimination:

1. The right of Palestinian Arab refugees and their descendents to return to Arab villages lost in 1948 will be protected by the new Palestinian state.

2. While 20% of Israel’s citizens are Arabs, not one Jew will be allowed to live in a Palestinian State

3. Anyone who sells land to a Jew will be liable to the death penalty in the Palestinian State

4. Those who murder Jews are honored on all official Palestinian media outlets.

5. Palestinian Authority maps prepared for the Palestinian State depict all of Palestine under Palestinian rule

6. PA maps of Jerusalem for the Palestinian State once again delete the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem

7. Recent PA documents claim all of Jerusalem for the future Palestinian State.

8. The right of Jewish access to Jewish holy places is to be denied in the new Palestinian State.

9. The Draft Palestinian State Constitution denies juridical status to any religion except for Islam.

10. No system which protects human rights or civil liberties will exist in a Palestinian State.

If that is not a formula for a totalitarian apartheid state of Palestine, then what is?

Apartheid against Women

Alan Dershowitz and other commentators accuse the Hamas government of Gaza of practicing “apartheid… against women.” Victor Davis Hansonextends this accusatio to the Palestinian-ruled territories generally.

Apartheid against gays

According to the International Lesbian and Gay Association, Palestinian Authority law prohibits sexual relations between two men.

Alan Dershowitz and other commentators accuse the Hamas government of Gaza as practicing “apartheid… against… gays.

Apartheid against the Palestinian refugees of 1948

The Palestinian Authority, most residents of which were residents of Jordan or Egypt until the 1967 War; since it became self-governing under the Oslo Accords of 1993, the Palestinian Authority has been accused of practicing apartheid against the Palestinian refugees of 1948 living under its jurisdiction.

If you want to use the term “apartheid” to characterize some aspect of Middle East politics, then Balata is a good place to apply it. It is the Palestinian Authority’s answer to Soweto. The PA does not permit the children of Balata to go to local schools. It does not permit the people of Balata to build outside the one square kilometer. The people of Balata are prevented from voting in local elections, and the PA provides none of the funds for the necessary infrastructure of the camp — including sewers and roads.

Sol Stern characterizes Balata as a

Quasi-apartheid welfare ghetto. The Palestinian Authority does not consider the residents of Balata citizens of Palestine; they do not vote on municipal issues, and they receive no PA funding for roads or sanitation. The refugee children—though after 60 years, calling young children “refugees” is absurd—go to separate schools run by UNRWA, the UN’s refugee-relief agency. The “refugees” are crammed into an area of approximately one square kilometer, and municipal officials prohibit them from building outside the camp’s official boundaries, making living conditions ever more cramped as the camp’s population grows.

See also:
Apartheid in Bahrain censored
Arab Apartheid?

Administrator responsible for deleting the article: Postdlf

__________

Source:

http://wikibias.com/2011/04/apartheid-in-palestine-censored-by-wikipedia/

Kurds (also) victims of Arab racism – Apartheid in Syria

April 27, 2011

Kurds under racist apartheid Syrian Arab Republic

..Like Gaddafi today, seven years ago Assad deployed his air force against the Kurds.

Scores were killed and thousands were arrested. Many of those arrested were tortured by Assad’s forces.

The discrimination that Kurds have faced under Assad and his father is appalling. Since the 1970s, more than 300,000 Kurds have been stripped of their Syrian citizenship. They have been forcibly ejected from their homes and villages in the north and resettled in squalid refugee camps in the south. The expressed purpose of these racist policies has been to prevent territorial contiguity between Syrian, Iraqi and Turkish Kurds and to “Arabize” Syrian Kurdistan where most of Syria’s oil deposits are located.

The Kurds make up around 10 percent of Syria’s population. They oppose not only the Baathist regime, but also the Muslim Brotherhood. Represented in exile by the Kurdistan National Assembly of Syria, since 2004 they have sought the overthrow of the Assad regime and its replacement by democratic, decentralized federal government. Decentralizing authority, they believe, is the best way to check tyranny of both the Baathist and the Muslim Brotherhood variety. The Kurdish demand for a federal government has been endorsed by the Sunni-led exile Syrian Reform Party.

This week the KNA released a statement to the world community. Speaking for Syria’s Kurds and for their Arab, Druse, Alevi and Christian allies in Syria, it asked for the “US, France, UK and international organizations to seek [a] UN resolution condemning [the] Syrian regime for using violence against [the Syrian] people.”

The KNA’s statement requested that the US and its allies “ask for UN-sponsored committees to investigate the recent violence in Syria, including the violence used against the Kurds in 2004.”

http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Columnists/Article.aspx?id=214197

What is Mr Blair’s Mission? KurdishMedia.com – By Dr Kamal Mirawdeli 01/11/2001 00:00:00 …
It seems that Mr Blair has not even known or even discreetly mentioned to his hosts that Syria is occupying a part of Kurdistan in which one million Kurds are living who are subject to the most appalling racist apartheid policies of oppression and assimilation. 150,000 of them are even deprived of having passports, being considered as ‘foreigners’ with no right, legally, to enter into employment or marriage. Syria does not allow the Kurds or to call their children Kurdish names.

Syria does not allow the Kurds to use their language for education and promote their art and culture, or to have their own legal political organisations. That is despite the fact that the Kurds are Muslims! But being Muslim for Arab racist regimes that use Islam as an Arabising racist ideology, is equivalent to being an Arab – full stop.

http://www.kurdmedia.com/article.aspx?id=8259

What happens when your oppressors are next-door neighbors … 14 Jun 2006… I raise my palm for Turkey, Syria, Iran and even Iraq…. and that Apartheid didn’t just melt away on its own, …

http://www.kurdmedia.com/article.aspx?id=12624
Western Kurdistan which is occupied by Syria, by – File Format: PDF/Adobe

Acrobat
Dr. Jawad Mella – Western Kurdistan which is occupied by Syria racist,

bloody and despotic regimes of the world. It is the same now for the

Syrian regime …
http://www.kncsite.com/kiteb/WK.pdf

West Kurdistan and the “Arab Awakening” ‎ 3.2.2011
By Minhaj Akreyi

February 3, 2011
Following the mass protests throughout Tunisia that was caused by an act

of self-immolation by a frustrated young man due to high unemployment,

food inflation, corruption, lack of freedom of speech, poor living conditions, among others, which brought down an authoritarian government of 23 years, the Arab people are finally becoming courageous and brave enough to stand up to injustice and oppression against their government; and this new phenomenon among the Arab people is starting to spread hroughout the Arabic countries. Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s incumbent president, or more like dictator, of 30 years who is feeling the high frustration and anger of its 80 million population protesting vigorously in the streets of many of its large cities, including Cairo, is greatly on the verge of collapse and may soon be joining his Tunisian colleague Ben Ali in Jeddah. Algerian, Jordanian, and Yemeni frustrated, oppressed, and angry people have also joined their Tunisian and Egyptian brethren protesting in their homeland against their highly corrupted governments.

The trend, as it seems, will most likely hit Syria as well. The Syrian regime, which is controlled by the Assad family since 1963, is as corrupted as Hosni Mubarak and his party. Unemployment in Syria is as high as of Egypt; the police and secret forces are as brutal and oppressive; freedom of speech or press does not exist; and the living conditions are no better. It is only natural, and the right of the people, that the people stand up against this tyrannical and dictatorial regime and replace it with one who values human life; who values human dignity; who values education and employment for its people; who values its people; for no government should be allowed to exist if it fails to provide the basic demands of its people. And among all this, one that would give equal rights to its minorities, such as the Kurds, whom for the last 90 years have been systematically oppressed and having their
Kurdish language banned by the Syrian government.

Syria since its creation of modern state has done whatever it could to oppress the Kurdish people in its hope to eradicate and assimilate them.

The Kurdish language is banned; there are over 200,000 Kurds whom are
labeled as foreigners because the Syrian government has stripped them off
of their citizenship and thus these people are not allowed to get a job,
buy a property, open a business, and they are not even allowed to repair
their houses; in 1965 the Syrian government created an “Arabic belt” in
an attempt to change demographic features of the Kurdish populated areas
in which over 150,000 people were displaced out of their homes and today
it is as relevant as it is effecting the Kurdish people greatly; the
burial of over 500,000 Kurdish people alive; including the many other
atrocious acts such as the burning of a movie theater burning 300 students; mass disappearances of critics; various discriminatory and racist laws, among many other horrendous acts.

That is why in order to bring an end to this oppression, the Kurds of Syrian-occupied Kurdistan, or West Kurdistan, must carefully examine the waves of protests that seem to be spreading throughout the Middle East; they must monitor the protests very closely. The already-too many and divided political parties of over 15-20 of West Kurdistan must urgently
communicate with each other in order to lay out a map and plans on what ought to be done should the Syrian population mass protests and should the Assad regime fell. It is of most crucial that all the parties unite at this critical time and opportunity that may prove fruitful and may define a moment in West Kurdistan’s history; and I won’t be too surprised
if something like South Kurdistan is achieved. But of course, in order to reach the level of South Kurdistan,www.ekurd.netfor West Kurdistan it will not be as easy for if the Assad regime fell, there will still be standing Syrian army,the racist Ba’ath party, and other chauvinistic and racist Arab nationalists who would oppose any autonomy or even human rights for the Kurds and so they will do just about everything the Assad regime has been doing since 1963 to make sure the Kurds do not control their faith and to have the Kurds remain as oppressed.

Something that should have been done long time ago, it is still not too late that the more prominent and bigger parties of West Kurdistan should
reach the lesser known and smaller parties to create the same plans and methods in reaching their same goals. The political and religious figures there should gather along with the tribal leaders and youth and have their understanding and trust within each other; envision a coherent and practical plan on what ought to be done given different scenarios; must
have clear demands and goals to present it to a next government should it be needed; decided whether they will fight for autonomy or independence given the position they might be in. They should, if not already done so, contact Kurds outside of West Kurdistan and seek advises, not just with
Kurds from West Kurdistan but in all parts of Kurdistan. They should know their ways of communication and have plan B ready in case the Syrian regime shut off internet and phone lines, which is very likely; the Kurdish population should be made aware and be ready to mass protest.

However, if not most importantly, than equally importantly, there should be Peshmergas ready to fight and defend should there be the need, which most likely there be the need. Because with Assad in power or not, the Syrian army will most definitely fight and without Peshmergas there stands no chance for West Kurdistan to have its demands respected and goals achieved. But the question remains, where will Peshmergas come from
considering the fact that West Kurdistan does not have any? Should the veterans Peshmergas of South Kurdistan join their brothers and sisters for the fight? Should the PKK send some (in 1,000’s) of their freedom fighters there? Or should PJAK, for time being, leave the fight against the Iranian army and fight the Syrian army?

There are serious and absolutely important questions and considerations that needs to be done by Kurds of West Kurdistan and Kurds of all parts of Kurdistan including the Kurds in Diaspora to start right away weighing options and creating plans if the Syrian population rise to fight their
oppressive regime for their long overdue honor, dignity, freedom, human rights, employment rights, education freedom. There could be protests and there could be no protests in Syria; similarly, Assad regime could fell or it may not fell, but that is for future to see. What the Kurds cannot
afford to lose however is if the chance come and they are not prepared for it, and once that chance leaves, there won’t be another chance for a
very long time.

http://www.ekurd.net/mismas/articles/misc2011/2/state4601.htm

Take A Look in the Mirror / Ben Dror Yemini | Rivka Shpak Lissak First, it should be stated that all Arab countries conduct an official apartheid regime. The Kurds in Syria are under a violent military regime.

http://www.rslissak.com/content/take-look-mirror-ben-dror-yemini

[Islamic] Republic of Turkey – the First Fascist State in History

April 27, 2011

Republic of Turkey – the First Fascist State in History
By Times.am at 6 April, 2011, 11:25 am

The Republics of Armenia and Turkey have been in a long-lasting conflict with no resolution in sight. Therefore a proper assessment of the political system and state ideology of Turkey is extremely important for the Armenian state to build a competent foreign policy and properly position itself in the international arena.

The West has traditionally portrayed the Republic of Turkey which emerged on the ruins of the Ottoman Empire as a secular democratic Muslim state. Even though this cliche is being persistently circulated in the Western media and very often uttered by American and European officials, it is far from reality. Unfortunately, Armenia has not yet dared to offer its own assessment of modern Turkish statehood and tacitly put up with the aforementioned international narrative.

In reality, one of the consequences of the Armenian Genocide was the creation of the first fascist state in Europe’s periphery. The Republic of Turkey had all the core characteristics inherent to fascism and Nazism, which later emerged in Italy, Germany and some other European countries. Below the six main characteristics of Turkish fascism are identified:

1. Turkish chauvinism and genocidal policies. Mustafa Kemal (Ataturk) was formerly himself a member of the governing body of Committee of Union and Progress (CUP), the political organization of murderous Young Turks. Once in power, Ataturk and the Kemalists not only continued the Armenian Genocide, but directed their tested policies of extermination of an entire people against Greeks and other ethnic minorities. In Eastern Armenia alone, the Kemalists destroyed 200,000 Armenians (1920-1921), in Smyrna – 100,000 Greeks and Armenians (September 1922), in the Black Sea regions – about 300,000 Pontian Greeks (1919-1923). They also continued the Genocide against the Assyrians, of whom about 500,000 were annihilated by the Turkish forces from 1915 to 1923. Deportations, mass exterminations, political and cultural repressions against the Kurds, the second largest ethnic group in modern Turkey, began immediately after the Armenian Genocide and continue to this day. All Kurdish attempts to protect their basic national and human rights were brutally suppressed in 1925, 1927, and 1937. In 1980s and 1990s, more than a million Kurds were deported to large cities (during these deportations, according to various estimates, two to three thousand Kurdish villages were destroyed).

Turkish chauvinism was legislatively approved in the Constitution of 1937 under the auspicious name of “nationalism” (Milliyetçilik ), openly aiming to assimilate non-Turkic ethnic groups and legally identifying them as Turks. Although later the concept of Turkish “nationalism” was interpreted in different ways, its chauvinistic nature and essence has remained unchanged.

The modern discipline of Holocaust and Genocide Studies identifies the denial of genocide as an extension of genocidal policies. Gregory Stanton, former President of the International Association of Genocide Scholars, emphasizes that “Denial is the final stage of genocide. It is a continuing attempt to destroy the victim group psychologically and culturally, to deny its members even the memory of the murders of their relatives. That is what the Turkish government today is doing to Armenians around the world.” Elie Wiesel, the famous Holocaust survivor and political activist, has repeatedly called Turkey’s 90-year-old campaign to cover up the Armenian genocide a double killing, since it strives to kill the memory of the original atrocities. The Armenian government should have assessed Turkish denialism in similar and even graver terms, but to this date it has failed to do so for no apparent reason.

In contemporary democratic Germany it is simply impossible to imagine a street or institution named in honor of any of the leaders of the Third Reich – indeed it is legally prohibited! Meanwhile, in “democratic” Turkey the leaders of CUP, i.e. the criminal organizers and perpetrators of the Armenian Genocide, are openly glorified. For example, a district in Istanbul, a few avenues and streets in different parts of Istanbul, boulevards in Ankara and Edirne, primary schools in Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir, and a high school in Konya are all named after Talat Pasha, Minister of the Interior and (in 1917-1918) Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire, who personally orchestrated the Armenian Genocide.

“Democratic” Turkey also actively uses the infamous Article 301 of its Criminal Code (“insulting Turkishness”, in 2008 changed to “insulting the Turkish nation”). This law, among other things, makes the recognition of the Armenian Genocide a crime. About 50 trials have already been held based on this article.

2. Totalitarianism. Up to the late 1940s Turkey was a one-party state. However, even today “democratic” Turkey periodically imposes a ban on one political party or another (even those elected to parliament), while its leaders are thrown in jail on trumped-up political charges. The last of a series of such cases occurred in December 2009, when the Turkish Constitutional Court banned the pro-Kurdish Democratic Society Party (DTP), which had 21 MPs. All the property of DTP was confiscated by the state. This even prompted the European Union, which by and large turns a blind eye to the racist repressions against 20 million Kurds in Turkey, to remind Ankara that “the dissolution of political parties is an exceptional measure that should be used with utmost restraint.”

Turkey’s state propaganda, all-inclusive revision and falsification of the Ottoman and modern Turkish history through carefully controlled scholarship, school curricula, and legally enforced taboos, including severe restraints on free access to information and freedom of expression, resulted in effective brainwashing of its own population.

3. Statism (etatism). The Turkish Constitution of 1937 strengthened the regulatory role of the state not only in the economy, but also in ideology.

4. Anti-communism. Ataturk, despite his friendship with the Soviet Union, was a staunch anti-communist. The Communist Party of Turkey has been banned since 1923 and remained illegal throughout its whole history, having been routinely subjected to most brutal state repressions.

5. Leaderism and the cult of personality. In Turkey, the cult of Ataturk is still in full bloom. Statues and monuments of Ataturk are installed in every city, his portraits are hung in all government and administrative institutions, as well as in school classrooms, and his portraits are on banknotes and coins of all denominations. Criticism of his life activities and biography are criminalized and carrying Ataturk as one’s last name is banned.

6. Militarism and aggression. Turkey is one of the most militarized countries on earth, with the eighth-largest army in the world and second only to the United States in NATO. The decisive sway of the Turkish military on domestic politics is well known: one only needs to recall the three coups d’état carried out by the Turkish army in 1960, 1971 and 1980, as well as the harsh ousting of Islamist Prime Minister N. Erbakan from power in 1997 (incidentally, his ruling “Welfare Party” was also banned).

The Republic of Turkey has repeatedly resorted to military force or threat of force against neighboring countries, such as Syria, Cyprus, Iraq, Greece, and Armenia. The Northern part of Cyprus, Syria’s district of Alexandretta, and the western part of Armenia still remain occupied. The Turkish army also regularly invades Northern Iraq.

In 1920, the first Republic of Armenia fell under the blows of Kemalists. Indeed, the direct order that Karabekir-Pasha received from Mustafa Kemal literally specified “to destroy Armenia morally and physically.” Immediately after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Turkey’s policy towards the “third” Republic of Armenia became explicitly aggressive in nature once again, including an ongoing land-blockade, refusal to establish diplomatic relations, enduring Armenian Genocide denial, support and assistance to Azerbaijan in its preparations for a new military venture against Armenia, etc.

The emergence and subsequent superstructural metamorphosis of fascism in Turkey was not adequately evaluated by Soviet/Russian or Western historiographies and neither was it reflected in international legal and political documents. However, this should not lead anyone astray. Generally, Turkophilia in political and academic circles in both the West and USSR/Russia, is a quite multi-faceted phenomenon and a separate topic for discussion. Here an incomplete explanation will suffice: the USSR was simply unable to call Ataturk a fascist, because “the leader of the world proletariat” Vladimir Lenin and Ataturk signed the infamous Moscow Treaty of “Friendship and Brotherhood” on March 16, 1921 (incidentally, exactly 90 years ago). Meanwhile, the West avoided such an unfavorable evaluation, because Turkey has historically been considered – and actually was – a barrier against Russia/Soviet Union, and a key strategic ally. Turkey’s alliance with the West was legally formalized by its accession to NATO in 1952.

If the international community (alias “the great powers”) does not adequately characterize the fascist essence of the modern Turkish state, this is simply because it has not been interested in such an exposé. But independent Armenia, by failing to officially identify and denounce the fascist nature of Turkish state, not only refuses to clearly see and understand the true ideology, strategic goals and calculations of its age-old archenemy, but also deprives itself of the chance to present properly its own dire geostrategic situation to the world. After all, Armenia’s present security predicaments are a direct result of crimes by Turkish fascism!

Attempts to rehabilitate Turkey without having it incur its due responsibility – in particular, without the territorial restitutions and other compensations to Armenia – can lead to new and repeated genocides. This is the main conclusion that the international community has yet to draw.

ARMEN AYVAZYAN
Doctor of Political Sciences
“Hayastani Zrucakic”, N: 10 (173 ), 18 March, 2011

http://times.am/2011/04/06/republic-of-turkey-%E2%80%93-the-first-fascist-state-in-history/

Racism in the Islamic Republic of Iran

April 11, 2011

Racism in the Islamic Republic of Iran

Victims include:
Azeris
Beluchis
Jews
Kurds
Blacks
Bahai
Arabs

UN anti-racism panel finds Iran discriminating against Kurds, Arabs, other ethnic minorities 28.8.2010

GENEVA, — A United Nations panel says Arabs, Kurds and other minorities in Iran face discrimination because of their ethnicity.

The U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination says minorities in the Islamic republic don’t enjoy the same rights to free expression, health and housing as other ethnic groups.

The panel published a report Friday urging Iran to end all forms of discrimination and provide clearer information for future reports.

The Geneva-based panel also rejected Iran’s claims that discrimination against women and religious minorities such as the Baha’i isn’t covered by the U.N.’s 1969 anti-racism convention. �
UN anti-racism panel finds Iran discriminating against Kurds, Arabs, other ethnic minorities.
— UN racism body decries Iran’s treatment of ethnic minorities

Iran should do more to protect its ethnic minorities such as Arabs, Kurds and Baluch, a United Nations human rights body said on Friday.

The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), a group of 18 independent rights experts, said Iran lacked data on the numbers of ethnic minorities despite a census in 2007, but the participation of such people in public life appeared to be lower than could be expected.

Several armed groups opposed to the government are active in Iran, mostly made up of ethnic Kurds in the northwest, Baluch in the southeast and Arabs in the southwest.

“The Committee expresses concern at the limited enjoyment of political, economic, social and cultural rights by… Arab, Azeri, Balochi, Kurdish communities and some communities of non-citizens,” it said in a report on a regular review of Iran’s compliance with a 1969 international treaty banning racism.

It also urged Iran to continue its efforts to empower women and promote their rights, paying particular attention to women belonging to ethnic minorities.

Some tenets of Islamic sharia law disadvantage Iranian women, Indian committee member Dilip Lahiri said. “On the other hand, in terms of their education and access to jobs, very remarkable progress has been made in Iran,” he told a briefing.

The committee voiced concern at reports of a selection procedure for state officials and employees, known as gozinesh, requiring them to demonstrate allegiance to the Islamic Republic of Iran and the state religion, which could limit opportunities for ethnic and religious minorities.

It said that lack of complaints was not proof of the absence of racial discrimination, as victims may not have confidence in the police or judicial authorities to handle them.

It called on Iran to set up an independent national human rights institution and report back to it at the start of 2013 on how it was dealing with the concerns and recommendations.

Copyright, respective author or news agency, The Associated Press AP�
http://www.ekurd.net/mismas/articles/misc2010/8/irankurd648.htm

Iran and the challenge of diversity: Islamic fundamentalism, Aryanist racism, and democratic struggles
Alireza Asgharzadeh, Palgrave Connect (Online service)
Palgrave Macmillan, 2007 – 249 pages
This book interrogates the racist construction of Arya/Aria and Aryanism in an Iranian context, arguing that a racialized interpretation of these concepts has given the Indo-European speaking Persian ethnic group an advantage over Iran?s non-Persian nationalities and communities. Based on multidisciplinary research drawing on history, sociology, literature, politics, anthropology and cultural studies, Alireza Asgharzadeh critiques the privileged place of Farsi and the Persian ethnic group in contemporary Iran. The book highlights difference and diversity as major socio-political issues that will determine the future course of social, cultural, and political developments in Iran. Pointing to the increasing inadequacy of Islamic fundamentalism in functioning as a grand narrative, Asgharzadeh explores the racist approach of the current Islamic government to issues of difference and diversity in the country, and shows how these issues are challenging the very existence of the Islamic regime in Iran.
http://books.google.com/books?id=RlY-SQAACAAJ

Iran: A People Interrupted
Hamid Dabashi – New Press, 2008 – 324 pages – Page 151
And the bogus pro- Palestinian politics of the reigning regime degenerates into an anti-Jewish language. Iranian racism is particularly evident in Tehran, where similar racist negativity is directed at provincial Iranians— the Isfahanis, the Rashtis, the Azaris, the Kurds, the Lors, the Baluchis, the Arabs, or what the Tehranis in moments of unsurpassed whitewashed racism call dehatis, a nasty derogatory term meaning “the peasants.” The roots of this Tehrani-based racism is deeply buried in the whitewashed, Eurocentric Iranian bourgeoisie, who grotesquely identify with Europe, dye their hair blond, provincial Iranians.
http://books.google.com/books?&id=2pHtAAAAMAAJ&dq=lors
http://books.google.com/books?&id=2pHtAAAAMAAJ&dq=denigrate

Page 139
The sharp contrast in my parents’ skin colors alerted me to an astounding prevalence of Iranian racism very early in my life.2 My father’s nickname was ” Dadi Siah,” or “Dadi the Black” — his name being Khodadad, Dadi for short.
http://books.google.com/books?&id=2pHtAAAAMAAJ&dq=dadi

A Review of the imposed war by the Iraqi regime upon the Islamic Republic of Iran. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Legal Department – 1983 – 194 pages – Page xvii
Airing several radio broadcasts in the Persian, Turkish, Armenian, Kurdish, Turkman and Baluchi languages in order … During celebrations marking the twelfth anniversary of coming to power of the Ba ‘athist Party in lraq, placards bearing slogans such as “leave the Arabs of Ahwaz alone”, “the Arab Gulf is the graveyard of the racist Persian regime” were…
http://books.google.com/books?id=JiPRAAAAMAAJ&q=baluchi
http://books.google.com/books?id=JiPRAAAAMAAJ&q=racist

Near East/South Asia report: Issue 84156
United States. Foreign Broadcast Information Service, United States. Joint Publications Research Service – Page 34
Political organizations in Ahvaz were hoping for another regime to succeed the Shah’s anti-Arab, racist regime which was … At first, the national movement in Ahvaz supported the present regime in Iran and gave it its blessings.�
http://books.google.com/books?&id=eTG6AAAAIAAJ&dq=racist

Human rights, the UN and the Bahá’ís in Iran – Page 401
Nazila Ghanea-Hercock – 2002 – 628 pages – Preview
He said that the Committee had tried to establish whether Iran’s internal laws were in conformity with the Convention but that ‘the latest report offered no solution to that question’. The only information forthcoming from the … submitted together in document CERD/C/226/Add.8 dated 11 February 1993.41 This was again a very dry legislative document, referring to various constitutional and other legal provisions against racism in Iran with absolutely no light�
http://books.google.com/books?id=GeHNoviEXw0C&pg=PA401

Al-Ahwaz.com – aboutUsThus, draw attention to Ahwaz Internet network and the Ahwazi Arab info Center are Media … Iran has been applying a policy of racial discrimination in the …
http://www.al-ahwaz.com/english/2011/index.php?page=aboutUs

Peter Tatchell: Iran is a Racist State27 Oct 2006 … Iran is waging a secret, racist war against its Arab population. …. Ahwaz produces 90% of Iran ’s oil and 10% of OPEC’s global output. …
http://www.petertatchell.net/international/iranraciststate.htm

Iran after the revolution: crisis of an Islamic state – Page 231
Saeed Rahnema, Sohrab Behdad – 1996 – 256 pages
Turkish and Arab domination over Iran in the remote past was declared the main historical obstacle to the continuity of the glorious Persian empire. This racist ideology denied the national, linguistic and cultural diversity of Iran.
http://books.google.com/books?id=VlyCpbY9_QQC&pg=PA231

Azerbaijan Since Independence – Page 460
Svante E. Cornell – M.E. Sharpe, 2010 – 512 pages
After the summer 2003 demonstrations, the Iranian government cracked down on student as well as nationalist organizations. A 19-year-old Azeri girl was executed by Iranian authorities in July 2003 for her role in the protests (―Ethnic Azeri Student Leader Killed in Iran—Paper, BBC Monitoring International Reports, July 22, 2002). In an earlier incident, in January 2000, Iranian forces had opened fire on a demonstration in Tabriz (―Azeri TV Says Iranian Police Opened Fire During Rally in Tabriz, BBC Summary of World Broadcasts, January 10, 2000).
http://books.google.com/books?id=whVDskeHl2YC&pg=PA460

Racist insults against Azerbaijani Turks in Iran Iranian.com 10 May 2010 … If anyone has been to this juvenile site you’ll know that it …
http://www.iranian.com/main/blog/tapesh/racist-insults-against-azerbaijani-turks-iran

Iran’s anti-Arab racism Comment is free guardian.co.uk 26 Oct 2007 … Peter Tatchell: Iran treats its Arab minority as second-class citizens. Now it is planning to hang six of them after rigged trials held in …
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2007/oct/26/iransantiarabracism

Netherlands Institute of Human Rights – CERD Concluding Observations: IRAN ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF – 20 Feb 2011 … The Committee recommends that the State party undertake the necessary measures to harmonize its domestic legislation with the Convention. It also recommends that the State party take further steps for public dissemination of the provisions of the Convention and the possibilities for its invocation to combat racial discrimination, including in minority languages, and that it provide its Government officials with education and training in this area.

8. The Committee notes the information furnished by the State party on the definition of racial discrimination in article 19 of the Iranian Constitution and reiterates its concern that this definition does not explicitly cover the forms of racial and ethnic discrimination prohibited under the Convention. (art. 1)

The Committee again urges the State party to consider reviewing the definition of racial discrimination contained in its Constitution and domestic law in order to bring it into full conformity with article 1, paragraph 1, of the Convention.

9. While commending the efforts undertaken by the State party to empower women, the Committee is concerned that women of minority origin may be at risk of facing double discrimination. (art. 2)
The Committee draws the State party’s attention to its general recommendation No. 25 (2000) on gender-related dimensions of racial discrimination and recommends that the State party continue its efforts to empower women and promote their rights, paying particular attention to women belonging to minorities.

10. The Committee notes the information furnished by the State party on the 1985 Press Act. The Committee also notes the efforts undertaken by the State party to combat racist discourse in the media by applying sanctions to newspapers whose publications have included racist discourse. However, the Committee is concerned at continued reports of racial discrimination, inter alia, directed against Azeri communities in the media, including stereotyped and demeaning portrayals of those peoples and communities. The Committee is also concerned at the reports of racial discrimination in everyday life and statements of racial discrimination and incitement to hatred by government officials. (art. 4)

The Committee recommends that the State party take appropriate steps to combat manifestations in the media, as well as in everyday life, of racial prejudice that could lead to racial discrimination. The Committee also recommends that, in the area of information, the State party promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among the various racial and ethnic groups in the State party, especially on the part of public officials, and including through the adoption of a media code of ethics that would commit the media to showing respect for the identity and culture of all communities in the State party, taking into account the possible intersection of racial and religious discrimination. It reiterates its previous request that the State party submit information in its next periodic report on the application of this law to combat racial discrimination…
http://sim.law.uu.nl/SIM/CaseLaw/uncom.nsf/804bb175b68baaf7c125667f004cb333/4af24cf864d4b316c125778f0032b7a2?OpenDocument

Today.Az – All news from Azerbaijan – 16 Nov 2006 … […]
Balochis have been preyed upon by the Iranian regime. On 23 August 2006, the Marsad Group attacked a village near Zahidan, the provincial capital of Balochistan, and killed two young men in front of women and children. They were forced out of their homes, to search for the members of resistance movement and weapons. The two young men had protested against the ill treatment of the women. On the 24th of August Amir Hamzeh Eidouzehi, a young man, was hanged in public in Baloch town of Khash, and another young men, Ali Jan Moradi, was hanged in IranShahr on 27 August 2006, both were accused of instigating public trouble and drug trafficking, a sentenced without trail. On the 24th of September three men identified as Ali Karimi, Gholam Koohkan, and Khodamorad Lashkarzadeh, were hanged in prison in provincial capital Zahedan. These dissidents were also executed on charges of drug smuggling and convicted without trial.

Azeri Turks, comprising around a third of the Iranian population and also subject to racism in Iran, have also backed the campaign to halt the execution of Ahwazis. The Azerbaijani Youth Association is lobbying the European Parliament and European governments to take action. A representative wrote to the British Ahwazi Friendship Society (BAFS), saying: “It is with great concern that I have heard about Ahwazis in Iran facing execution. When it comes to life we make no difference on if they are Arabs or Turks. We must show solidarity with each other and together fight against these fascists.”
http://www.today.az/print/news/politics/32679.html

Iran: Azeri Turks protest against discrimination Workers’ Liberty – I will fight for the independendence of my Azeri brothers in Iran and their succession from the persion chavinism and racism.
http://www.workersliberty.org/node/6325