Posts Tagged ‘Algeria’

Highlighted mass casualties by (radical) Islam in four decades – 1971-2011 (updated Feb. 2012

February 19, 2012

Some of highlighted mass casualties by (radical) Islam in four decades – 1971-2011 (updated Feb. 2012)

PS
Most Israeli casualties are innocent non-combatants. Most Arab “Palestinian” casualties are combatants and/or involved in violent attacks. Not to mention Arab-Islamic intentional routine in causing deaths on their side via human shields. Same goes to Hezbollah tactics.
In fact: IDF’s unparalleled record of sparing civilians in counter-terrorism operations.

Of course, that’s besides the last bloody decade of over 18,000 Islamic terror attacks since 9/11/2001.

Note: Baathist racist Arab tyrants like Saddam Hussein, used Islam and ‘anti-infidel’ ideology as well.

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LEADING APARTHEID AND OPPRESSOR OF THE WORLD SETS UP “HUMAN RIGHTS” DIV. [OIC], LOL

April 23, 2010

LEADING APARTHEID AND OPPRESSOR OF THE WORLD SETS UP “HUMAN RIGHTS” DIV. [OIC], LOL

This BITTER JOKE is in the news:
Major Muslim group sets up human rights division 22 Apr 2010
… The Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) has announced it is setting up a special division that will deal with human rights.

http://www.jpost.com/MiddleEast/Article.aspx?id=173731


The regionalization of minority rights is most advanced within the West, in Europe and the Americas, By contrast, there is virtually no enthusiasm in Asia or the Arab/Muslim world to defelop regional norms on minortitiy rights. The whole issue remains essentially a taboo topic in many Asian and Middle Eastern countries…. Interestingly, the Organization of the Islamic Conference, representing Muslim-majority countries around the world, has a Department on Minority Affairs, but its formal resolutions focus exclusively on the rights of Muslim minorities living in non-Muslim majority countries (Khan 2002). (For representative example, see the OIC’s resolution ‘On Safeguarding the Rights of Muslim Communites and Minorities in non-OIC Member States’– Resoliution No. 1/10-MM (IS) , adopted at the 10th Session of the Islamic Summit Conference, 16-17 October-2203). The OIC has not attempted to codify norms, or to establish formal monitoring mechanisms, regarding the treatment of ethnic minorities within Muslim-majority countries, such as the oppression of the Kurds in Syria, the Ahwaz in Iran, the Hazars in Afghanistan, the Baluchs in Pakistan,the ‘Al-Akhdam’ in Yemen, or the Berbers in Algeria.

http://books.google.com/books?id=yySlh_dSElQC&pg=PA308
OIC, World’s Leading Human Rights Violators, To Set Up Own Human rights division

http://atlasshrugs2000.typepad.com/atlas_shrugs/2010/03/oichuman-rights-commission-.html

Muslim Human Rights–A Record Incompatible with the Civilized World …5 Mar 2010 … Yet despite the documents’ lofty principles, the record shows the Arab world is one of the worst offenders in the field of human rights. …

http://bsimmons.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/muslim-human-rights-a-record-incompatible-with-the-civilized-world-very-long-but-very-important/

Muslim extremist up for human-rights post 20 Apr 2010 … The Islamic legal code is enforced by religious police in Saudi Arabia and … Department has cited as one of the world’s worst abusers of human rights. … records it possesses prove a connection between CAIR and Hamas. …

http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=143545

Last year International Christian Concern placed (Muslim) Eritrea at number nine in its annual Hall of Shame. According to the ICC the intensity of persecution was “high” and “increasing.” In the ICC’s report this year the group abandoned its attempt to rank persecutors, but again included Eritrea among the worst ten. Eritrea placed among the top four in intensity of persecution, along with North Korea, Saudi Arabia, and Somalia.
http://spectator.org/archives/2010/04/02/eritrea-doubly-evil

It’s something along the line of Libya (where 2 Million Africans are oppressed because of racism) & Iran (where everyone suffers under the Islamist boot, especially minorities have a “special” treatment from the bastion of “tolerance,” like: Bahai’, Christians, Jews, Azeris, Baluchis, Ahwazis, etc.) hosting a UN conference on racism…

Arab writer admits: “We [Arabs] are racist to the bones”

April 11, 2010

Wednesday, 24 March 2010

“White Skin, Black Mask”: An Interview with Kamel Riahi

Kamel Riahi was born in the village of Al Manafikh, Tunisia, in 1974. Riahi, who is the head of the Arab Higher Institute for Translation, has recently moved back to his native Tunisia, and works as a full-time author. After having received his Masters in Arabic literature, he is currently preparing for his PhD in modern Arabic literature. He has published a number of short stories and novels, most notably The Scalpel, which won him the 2007 Comar D’Or for Arabic literature. Last November, Riahi joined four other Beirut39 participants at the inaugural ‘Nadwa’ (writers’ workshop) held by the International Prize for Arab Fiction. His texts have been translated into English, French, Italian and Hebrew. Riahi talks to Beirut39 about the racial representation of the characters in his novels, and his previous life as a nomad.

Translated from Arabic (below). Interviewed by Sousan Hammad.

Tell us more about you. When did you first start writing?

I hail from the northwest region of Tunisia, a marginalized region that suffers poverty and oblivion. Since childhood I moved between numerous jobs: I was a farmer, a pig and lizard hunter, a trafficker of cloths from Morocco, an electrician, and a bookseller in the backstreets of the capital city. I was also a traveling photographer who moved from north to south in order to capture pictures of jungle women. Later in my years I became an editor at a number of Tunisian and Arabic newspapers, and a teacher’s assistant at the University, a debater, and finally an international employee at various Arabic universities.

This journey has taught me that a human is like an idol, of whom Hemingway once said “a man can be destroyed but not defeated”. My life is full of ups and downs, an experimental life that never runs out of adventures. I answer to its appeal like a man haunted with a Jinn, playing hide-and-seek, I defeat it and it defeats me. I feel like I have a magical power that moves me to try and uncover it. I am not aware of what sort of power I may have, but it feels as if a creature larger than myself lives inside of me, struggling to break out to the world.

I started writing before I was conceived, I was in my mother’s womb, busily recording her plot to shed my blood and abort me. I struggled with all the medications and drugs she took to abort the baby, I counted her breaths.

I only started publishing in my twenties, after having lost my father.

And who are some of your most influential writers?

I am an avid reader to the point where I no longer remember who I read. I cultivate books and experiences, yet I never get influenced by anyone. I have always been myself: a complex identity yearning for independence. I love being a Bastard. I lived an orphan, and I loved being an orphan because this helped me become who I am. I have no idol, no father, no symbol and nothing is sacred.

There is a character in your novel, The Scalpel, who the narrator simply refers to as “the negro” (in Arabic as النيقرو .) At one point the narrator describes “the negro” as ‘simple and miserable’, one who reminds him of Mersault from The Stranger. Albert Camus characterized Mersault as being apathetic and alienated. These types of ‘racial’ social characterizations are similar to Ibn Khaldun’s writings. Would you say this is a deliberately placed connection?

Since I started writing fiction, I focused on the marginalized groups in Tunisia, whether socially or racially. My stories reflected the lives of the poor, the homeless, the shoe polishers, felines, young criminals, prostitutes, crushed employees, sailors and street peddlers.

I cared for the blacks in Tunisia so I tried to overcome the ideological arguments regarding them towards a psychological approach, and to show their daily suffering. The Negro in The Scalpel is a secondary character, yet he pleased my readers and nearly became the protagonist. A black man who hailed from the Tunisian countryside to became a guard at the “Jillaz” cemetery, the largest in Tunis. He is rebuked for being black. He lives a miserable life with his friend Bu-Lihya (the bearded one), both of them live in the same situation and pursue the same mystery: the case of the women’s assassinator. Both characters disappear on the same day in mysterious circumstances as if both are the two faces for the same token: one black, the other white, both of which are lost in the wilderness of the city.

You cannot judge a character by the name. This is what the novel tried to portray, since the entire novel is based on nicknames, not actual names. My novels mention no names. There’s the Negro, the bearded one, the mustached man, the Rotunda lady, the solid lady…etc. In the Arab World, a nickname ends the name.

The Negro chose to be called by this name because it reflected his color, his name did not suite him well, Saïd (The happy one), he felt alienated by that name.

My forthcoming novel will be titled The Gorilla, already one chapter has been translated into English by Peter Clark, a British translator. The protagonist will be a black man as well, and the story will uncover the (sexual) bastardness, racism and discrimination against blacks in the Arab world. Another novel I worked on, Diaries of a Slain Person, touches upon blacks in a new narrative game. These are themes that we must take into consideration, as I noticed in my many trips across the Arab world, with my careful observation, that Arabs are perfectly racist. A month ago, I was joined by a black Arab poet in Algeria, and was stunned by how she was received. All of this has confirmed to me that I am heading into the right track with this theme. Even in Tunisia, the most civilized Arab country, we still refer to whites as “free” and black as “slaves”. Blacks still suffer from being marginalized despite the fact that the law of the land and the constitution call for equality.

The name in the novel is a “wounded” name. Yet, names remain as signs that try to lead us, yet might be misleading in attempting to learn about ourselves. Saramago once said “Inside us there is something that has no name; that something is what we are.”

It might come as a surprise to you to learn that Negro was the term people called my black grandfather. I consider myself as someone of a Negro decent, although I am not black. Perhaps my wide nose proves this theory. Therefore, I am sympathetic towards the blacks ideologically, by heritage and by history. We, the whites, will not be liberated until we liberate ourselves from the racist views we have of other races and religions.

We still curse each other using “you’re Jewish” or “you’re Kurdish”, this is also racial and religious discrimination. Watch any Egyptian sitcom and tell me about the image of the Sudanese character. Listen to the Tunisian jokes about the Libyans or jokes about people from Hums in Greater Syria. Listen to the debates regarding noble families and family lineage… even horses now are divided between what is considered “noble” and what is not. We are racists to the bones. Attempting to hide or silence this fact will not help with the matter because we are a sick society which still suffers from the complexes of color and race.

http://beirut39.blogspot.com/2010/03/white-skin-black-mask-interview-with.html

More here:

http://arablit.wordpress.com/2010/03/28/kamel-riahi-on-arab-racism-writing-and-his-new-book/

Pseudo-state Algeria: A Monstrous, Pan-Arab Tyranny – Exposed by HRW (World Report 2010)

February 15, 2010

Pseudo-state Algeria: A Monstrous, Pan-Arab Tyranny, Exposed by HRW (World Report 2010)

Dr. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

February 09, 2010

[…]
Impunity for Past Abuses

Over 100,000 Algerians died during the political strife of the 1990s. Thousands more were “disappeared” by security forces or abducted by armed groups fighting the government, and have never been located, dead or alive. Perpetrators of atrocities during this era continue to enjoy impunity. The legal framework for that impunity is the 2006 Law on Peace and National Reconciliation, which provides an amnesty to security force members for the actions they took in the name of combating terrorism, and to armed group members not implicated in the most heinous acts.

[…]
Kabylia is the area whereby the Anti-Berber policies of the colonial French and their local puppets failed most; the Berbers are not a minority either in Algeria or in the other countries of the Atlas.

The Berbers constitute the totality of the local population; some of the Berbers forgot their native tongue, due to the racist, Pan-Arab, colonial policies of the French and the Algerian tyrannies.

In fact, Arabic speaking or Amazigh speaking people in Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Libya and Mauritania are all Berber.

Map of Kabylia. From:


http://www.moroccoboard.com/images/stories/kabyle.gif

http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/140861

Assyrians – the other victims of pan – Arabism’s racism

December 24, 2008

Assyrians – the other victims of pan – Arabism’s racism

…In the following years and the pain still piercing, Bakr Sidqi, the Baghdadi army’s chief responding to the zealous cry of the new pan-Arab fascists organised the cold blooded massacre of innocent Assyrians with the watchful eye of Imperial Britain, because they dared to ask for the recognition of the Assyrian nationality and the Assyrian cultural rights within the newly formed regime.
Betrayed and denied by Imperial Britain, the Assyrian national uprising was suppressed and the Assyrian rights’ movement was pigeonholed. For the next decades and under various successive regimes the Assyrians were known by their religion as ‘Christians’ until the ascent of the new Baathists to power in the hot summer of 1968. Then things started to change.
http://www.zindamagazine.com/html/archives/2002/7.1.02/index.php

What Happenned To the 80 Millions Assyrians After the Fall of Nineveh?
By: Paroqa D’Omta Ashoureeta
[18 April 2007]
Progenitor of Wars and Tyrannies: the Falsehood of Pan-Arabism
The deep and hidden reason of the tyrannical oppression practiced throughout the Middle East is the imposition by France and England of pan-Arabic nationalist cliques that intend to dictatorially arabize the various peoples of the Middle East, who are – all – not Arabs.
http://www.betnahrain.org/bbs/index.pl/noframes/read/15531

Husri correctly deduced that it was through education, especially children, that the “new morality” of Arabism was to be transmitted. In this endeavor, he achieved a great success. In this mission he was helped by a certain British advisor to the Iraqi Ministry of education by the name of Lionel Smith. Smith seems to have admired Husri’s passionate zeal for education, but is on record for stating that many of Husri’s “views were wrong”. Husri’s attitudes against non-Arabs seem to have been adopted by his son Khaldun al-Husri, a nationalist Arab historian who has attempted to minimize the violent destruction of the Assyrian community in Northern Iraq in the 1920s. This is reflected in:
Husri, H. (1974). The Asyyrian affair. The International Journal of Middle East Studies, 5, 161-176, 344-360.
For an account of the Assyrian tragedy consult: Stafford, R.S. (1935). The Tragedy of the Assyrians
http://www.venusproject.com/ecs/aFarrokhArab.html

Islamist Ethnic-Cleansing of Assyrians in Iraq
[August 13, 2008]
Assyrians are not seeking to re-establish Assyria, that is an unrealistic dream. Assyrians simply want to live in peace and freedom, to practice their religion, to teach their language and history. In the last 1400 years, thus has proven to be elusive, as every power that be wanted to assimilate Assyrians. We are called Arab-Christians, Iranian-Christians, Turkish-Christians and now Kurdish Christians… The Arabs had their Ba’ath ideology, with its pan-Arabism, where everyone was an Arab, even if he wasn’t
http://www.frontpagemag.com/articles/Read.aspx?GUID=D3CC0184-4CB4-48C5-9C98-1229267A8A52

Assyriac: Denied in Its Own Homeland But Accepted in England Therefore, sooner or later Assyrians in their homeland will either submit to absorption into “Pan Arabism Pot” or they will resist and be deported. …
http://www.atour.com/government/docs/20020124a.html

Assyrians and Kurds were struggling against the common oppressive Pan-Arabist regime of Saddam Hussein
http://www.aina.org/guesteds/20080416165822.htm

Is Pan-Arabism a Nationalism without a Nation?
[2007]
For a long period of time those called Arabs were the tribes living in the Arabian Peninsula… After the Islamic conquests, the number of Arabic-speakers began to rise. These new Arabic-speakers could not claim descent from the Arabs, and for many centuries they were not viewed as Arabs, nor did they consider themselves to be such.
[…]
The problem is that this totalizing theory did not present realistic and just solutions to the various conflicts that tear apart our region to this day. The policies of forced Arabization; the mistreatment of the Kurdish minority in Iraq, the oppression of the Kurds in Syria, the harassment of the Coptic minority in Egypt and the Assyrians and Chaldeans in Iraq; the provocations against what is left of the Jewish diaspora in a few countries like Yemen, Syria, and Iraq; and the intimidation and cultural negation of any minority that refuses to submit to what the peddlers of Pan-Arabism try to impose on them – all of this does nothing but generate more violence and tragedy.
If the military intervention in Iraq and the deposing of the Pan-Arabist Saddam Hussein regime has had one positive result, aside from the timid beginnings of a democratic political process, it is without doubt the fact that light has been shed on the great sectarian, linguistic, and cultural diversity with which the Middle East is blessed. The question of accepting the other’s difference and identity remains the greatest challenge for the Arab nationalists.
http://www.masrifeki.com/english.4.074.0.htm

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Fascism in the Arab world – pan Arabism

December 23, 2008

Fascism in the Arab world – Pan-Arabism, etc. (Part 1)

The Arab Predicament: Arab Political Thought and Practice Since 1967 – by Fouad Ajami – 1992 (page 135)
Fascism found an expression in the Young Egypt party, which was a parody of the fascist movement that swept Europe in the 1930s and 1940s; the Muslim Brotherhood thrived at a time of crisis and continues to survive at the present…
http://books.google.com/books?id=Qj-UEPal-cwC&pg=PA135&lpg=PA135

A History of Fascism, 1914-1945 – by Stanley G. Payne – 1996 – History (Page 352)
The Fascist regime had him proclaimed a “hero of Islam” and “defender of Islam” in Italian Libya, where a parallel Libyan Arab Fascist Party was created. If Mussolini supported Zionists to some extent as a lever against the British Empire, both he and Hitler subsidized Haj Amin el Husseini, the violently anti-Jewish grand mufti of Jerusalem. Anti-Jewish feeling mounted in parts of the Middle East during the 1930s, as the Fascist and Nazi regimes and doctrines made increasing sense to many Arab nationalists. King Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia sought German arms and contacts and was favorably received. Various delegations of Syrians and Iraqis attended the Niirnberg party congresses, and there were several different Arabic translations of Mein Kampf. Both the German and Italian regimes were active in propaganda in the Arab world, and there was much pro-German sentiment in Egypt. At least seven different Arab nationalist groups had developed shirt movements by 1939 (white, gray, and iron in Syria; blue and green in Egypt; … Syrian… Iraqi Futuwa… Young Egypt Movement … all three were territorially expansionist, with Sami Shawkat, the Futuwa ideologue, envisioning the “Arab nation” as eventually covering half the globe (though by vonversion…
http://books.google.com/books?id=NLiFIEdI1V4C&pg=PA352

A History of Fascism, 1914-1945 – by Stanley G. Payne – 1996 – History (Page 515)
As one approaches the Middle East, however, the trail becomes warmer. This is an area originally impacted to some extent by paradigmatic European fascism.
Some of the new nationalist regimes which developed in the Middle East during the second half of the century exhibited more of the characteristics of fascism than those of any other part of the world. A first example was the Egyptian regime under Nasser, with its Fuhrerprinzip, “Arab socialism,” a state sector of the economy approaching 40 percent, and bellicosity toward Israel…
At first glance a better case might be made for the Libyan dictatorship of Mu’ammar al-Gadhafi, established in 1969. Though the dictator of a major oil-exporting country, Gaddafi is a fanatical Muslim… “Brother Colonel” has renounced capitalism, preaching pan-Arabism and a form of “Arab socialism,” while his interest in militarism, violence, …
http://books.google.com/books?id=NLiFIEdI1V4C&pg=PA515

Chanting Allahu Akbar, they wreak destruction in Athens

December 9, 2008

Chanting Allahu Akbar, they wreak destruction in Athens


ATHENS, Greece – Gangs of youths smashed their way through central Athens, Thessaloniki and other Greek cities into the early hours Tuesday, torching stores, buildings and cars in a third day of mayhem after the fatal police shooting of a teenager.

In the country’s worst rioting in decades, dozens of shops, banks and luxury hotels had their windows smashed as youths fought running battles with riot police. Black smoke rose above the city center, mingling with clouds of tear gas. Broken glass littered the streets.

Hundreds of high school and university students joined self-styled anarchists in throwing everything from fruit and coins to rocks and Molotov cocktails at police and attacked police stations throughout the day. Police said some rioters were armed with crossbows, knives and swords.

“Cops! Pigs! Murderers!” protesters screamed at riot police.

Police said early Tuesday that 89 people had been arrested in Athensfor attacking police officers, vandalism and looting and 79 more were being questioned about possible involvement in the rioting. The fire service said it responded to more than 200 blazes in central Athens on Monday, about half of them in buildings and the rest in cars and trash bins used as barricades.

Greek police have clashed with hundreds of migrants waiting to submit asylum applications in Athens.
A riot broke out after one would be refugee plunged into a canal in exactly the same place where another asylum seeker was killed earlier this year.
Community leaders and politicians are warning that Athens inner city is at risk of becoming a racial battleground and are appealing for European assistance to defuse rising tension.
This year, Greece, has attracted a record 80 thousand illegal immigrants, but has been criticized by Europe for failing to help asylum seekers.
From Athens, Malcolm Brabant
Watch the video and hear the chants of Islamic Jihad:

http://www.youtube.com/v/tFuEgnRuhD8&hl=en&fs=1

Violence, Riots in Greece – Islamic Immigration – Eurabia

December 9, 2008
Riots in Greece – Islamic Immigration – Eurabia

A rising tide of (Muslims) migrants unsettles Athens

By Niki Kitsantonis Published: October 2, 2008
ATHENS: About 80,000 migrants have traveled to Greece this year and decided to stay illegally, according to the authorities, who say the country can no longer handle the task of guarding the European Union’s southeast flank.

While initial problems with the flood of migrants from Africa and the Middle East who are desperate to enter Europe centered on the Aegean islands, migrants are now wreaking havoc in the capital.

The historic center of Athens has been riven by several street battles in recent months, involving what the police characterize as rival groups, often involved in dealing drugs, from Afghanistan, Iraq and war-torn African countries wielding swords, axes and machetes.

After 11 people were hurt in one such brawl in late August, the police began 24-hour patrolling of the area. Store owners and residents are leaving the busy central shopping and restaurant district.

According to a residents’ group, dozens of people renting in the area have left their homes in the past year, and several stores have closed, chiefly small but long-established neighborhood conveniences like bakeries, hardware stores or delicatessens.

“People are scared and depressed, it’s getting worse and worse,” said Vassiliki Nikolakopoulou of the group, Panathinaia.

The top policy adviser for immigration issues at the Interior Ministry, which also oversees public order, blames the influx of about 80,000 migrants this year.

“Because of this phenomenon, we see more and more immigrants in central Athens trying to survive, often through illicit activities,” the official, Patroklos Georgiadis, said in a telephone interview. “This unpleasant situation – for the migrants and for us as an EU country – has become unbearable.”

Georgiadis said that Greece supported the stricter line on immigration being promoted by the bloc’s French presidency. “There will not be another wave of legalization of immigrants in Greece in the near future,” Georgiadis said, referring to the three programs that have granted work and residence permits to some 500,000 migrants, most of them undocumented foreigners – at least half from Albania – since 1997.

The unrest in Athens has triggered a backlash from the far-right party Laos, whose popularity has jumped to 5.4 percent in opinion polls from 3.5 percent when it entered Parliament a year ago.

“The city center has been taken hostage by gangs of illegal immigrants with knives – isn’t it about time we asked ourselves if we have too many of them?” a Laos legislator, Antonis Georgiadis, said during a recent television debate. He is not related to the immigration official.

Although some on the Greek left have warned against demonizing migrants, the Athens prefect, Yiannis Sgouros, who belongs to the main opposition Socialist party, Pasok, refers to an “explosive problem” in the heart of the capital, where thousands of migrants living in cheap hotels and derelict houses struggle to find work.

“Illegal immigrants are becoming pawns to local drug barons and are forming gangs,” Sgouros wrote last week in a letter to Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis. He added: “Something has to change or the area will become an arena for race clashes and gang wars.”

Thomas Hammarberg, a Swede who is human rights commissioner at the Council of Europe, has criticized Greece and other EU states for “criminalizing the irregular entry and presence of migrants as part of a policy of so-called migration management.”

“Political decision-makers should not lose the human rights perspective in migration,” Hammarberg wrote in an e-mail message when asked to comment for this article. “Migrants coming from war-torn states should be given refuge.”

The government says that Greece grants protection to all refugees, as long as their status can be proven. But UN refugee agency statistics show that Greece approves less than one percent of asylum applications, compared with a European Union average of 20 percent.

According to minority groups, the treatment of migrants from war-torn states as “illegals” rather than refugees requiring protection forces them to eke out a life on the fringes of society.

“Most don’t get asylum or social support and have to find other ways to survive,” Adam Ziat, leader of the Union of Sudanese Refugees, said in a dingy café behind central Omonia Square that serves as his office.

According to Ahmed Mowias, coordinator of the Greek Migrants’ Forum, newly-arrived refugees from conflict zones are being exploited by rackets run by Nigerians, Moroccans and Algerians established in the area for many years. “Refugees are the smallest links in the dealing chain,” Mowias, a longtime resident of Athens who is from Sudan, said.

Police figures show that most immigrants arrested on drug-related charges in central Athens this year were from war-torn states like Sudan, Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan

http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/10/02/europe/greece.php

Riots break out in two Greek cities after teenager killed in …7 Dec 2008 Now just because I already know the Greeks have had massive problems with pissed off muslim immigrants doesn’t mean that I think they are solely responsible but they are participating and in large numbers.

http://doctorbulldog.wordpress.com/2008/12/07/riots-break-out-in-two-greek-cities-after-teenager-killed-in-police-shooting/

Okay, so from BBC and AFP, and other news sources, I am not seeing the word “Muslim” or “Islam” being used here. The cops shoot and kill a youngster who was with a large crowd of youths wearing masks throwing rocks at them. Then, there are breakouts of riots by youths. Sounds like Islam to me. Kind of like if they walked into a church and found a lot of people praying and the church had a cross on it, sounds like Christian. But, can the media silence really be this fanatic on the issue? After all, the Islam connection is being mentioned elsewhere, with these events… yet doing a google news search with the words ‘Greek’ and ‘Islam’ is showing up nothing. Could it be these are far leftists? There are over a thousand stories on the issue.

http://www.plnewsforum.com/index.php/forums/viewthread/44717/

Corporate Media Covers Up Islamic Complicity in the Riots in Greece


http://fufor.twoday.net/stories/5375170/

More on the devil of Pan-Arabism racism in books

October 31, 2008

The Middle East – Page 89
by Library Information and Research Service – Middle East – 1999
After Sayyid Jamal, in Arabic countries and especially in Egypt, many
individuals were found who, by leaning on racism, Arabism and pan-Arabism, …
http://books.google.com/books?id=Ma1tAAAAMAAJ&q=arabism

A New Road for France – Page 30
by Jacques Soustelle, Benjamin Protter – Political Science –
1965 – 278 pages
Israel and French Algeria were… two barriers against which the totalitarian wave.. embodied by Nasser… a dictatorial pseudo-state type was created in Algeria, firmly tied to a single party, dominated by
the racist ideology of a Nasser-type pan-Arabism and by the revolutionary fanaticism of the Ulemas…algeria engaged itself in this fundamental domain on the road traced by Nasser’s Pan-Arabism and that the Christian and Jewish minority has been victim of a new discrimination …the enlightened spokesmen of human fraternity and peace are
symbolized
by Gamal Abdel-Nasser, who assiduously prepares, with the Nazis around him, the revenge of Himmler and Eichmann against Israel.
http://books.google.com/books?id=vPcAAAAAMAAJ&q=arabism+nasser

Violence, Political Culture & Development in Africa – Page 98
by Preben Kaarsholm – Social Science – 2006 – 208 pages
… and the racist ideology of ‘Arabism’ aligned with Islam that a succession of governments in Khartoum had adopted in fighting the wars in the South. …
http://books.google.com/books?id=G-pVrSSxU7IC&pg=PA98

Rethinking Nationalism in the Arab Middle
East – Page 213
by James P. Jankowski, I. Gershoni – History – 1997 – 372
pages
… of the Algerian Front Islamique du Salut (FIS) uses the 1967
defeat as proof that Arabism, being a form of racism, cannot elicit a sense
of community …
http://books.google.com/books?id=f3axNF2GdCkC&pg=PA213

African Politics – Page 84
by P. F. Gonidec – Political Science – 1980 – 367 pages
In the beginning, under the umbrella of Islamism and
subsequently of Arabism,
… This is the ‘anti-racist racism’ of JP Sartre, who has
very well analysed …
http://books.google.com/books?id=4lMcN-EWwTcC&pg=PA84

Racism, Culture, Markets – Page 139
by John Gabriel – Social Science – 1994 – 212 pages
without parallel economic growth… inevitably delivers a
population into some kind of ism, whether it be communism,
fascism or pan Arabism, and weans them away from democracy
http://books.google.com/books?id=wKsxy6lioasC&pg=PA139

Ideology and International Relations in the Modern World – Page
238
by Alan Cassels – Political Science – 1996 – 302 pages
With the exception of Zionism (hardly a Third-World
phenomenon), all the ideologies just discussed – pan-Islam, pan-Arabism and
other anti-Western …stimulated by some degree of racial ‘anti-white’ sentiment
http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA238&dq=&id=DkN6M2mvh9EC&output=html

Oppression in the Arab Muslim world, Algeria: Kabylia

August 25, 2008

Algerian’s songs of defiance live onSince his killing, he has become voice for Berber minorityBy Michael Slackman Published: MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2005TIZI OUZOU, Algeria: High in the jagged mountains covered with olive and fig trees, his voice booms from a minivan as it twists along narrow winding roads to drop off students after a day of school.

Head down into this city and there he is again, this time larger than life, in a poster mounted on a café wall while, of course, his voice booms from the stereo behind the counter. In shops, offices, restaurants – everywhere in this region, it seems – is the voice of Lounes Matoub.

“Never surrender, never surrender,” he sings, strong and folksy.

“Of course times change, but you should never forget.”

Someone tried to silence Matoub on June 25, 1998; his car was sprayed with 79 bullets. Instead, he became in death a powerful symbol of defiance for an ethnic minority that has challenged the government’s decision to define Algeria as an Arab nation.

This is Kabylia, one of Algeria’s most restive regions – home to a stubborn and proud ethnic minority of Berbers who since the end of the colonial era four decades ago have fought to preserve their cultural identity and independence. While there have been politicians and village elders helping lead the fight, the soul of this struggle is captured in music, especially the music of Matoub…http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/10/10/news/algeria.php

Amazigh-Voice.com [Amazigh News – Amazigh Events – Amazigh Art] “Tell the world that we have risen up against the oppression of the government.” (demonstrator in Bejaia, Kabylia, Algeria) … http://www.amazigh-voice.com/the%20world.htm

Towards the end of the colonial arabic islamic tyranny in North …Nov 29, 2007 … The Arabic Islamists terrorists invaded North Africa and succeeded to control … racism, or post-colonial nationalistic self-determinism. … http://www.kabylia.info/observer/spip.php?article112

When will the Arabic-Islamic colonialism end? – Kabylia Info Centuries and centuries of oppression, persecution, exploitation, murders, destruction and falsification have deprived this “redoubtable and numerous” … http://www.kabylia.info/letters/when-will-the-arabic-islamic-colonialism-end.html

…the question which needs an urgent answer is how an oppressed people such as Kabylians can manage to put an end to the devastating insecurity and anarchy when their despotic and tyrannical government uses them to maintain itself in power? http://www.kabylia.info/north-africa/for-a-federal-system-guaranteeing-provincial-autonomy.html

The Strategies of the Algerian regime to subdue Kabylia – Kabylia …Sep 28, 2007 … Kabyle politicians and the Kabyles at large, both in Algeria and in the … where there is nation-state oppression of regional cultures. … http://www.kabylia.info/observer/spip.php?article108

 

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