Archive for the ‘Arab immigration’ Category

Who’s Rioting in France? Muslims against France, against the French

November 28, 2007

Who’s Rioting in France? Muslims against France, against the French

Who’s Rioting in France? http://blogs.tnr.com/tnr/blogs/the_spine/archive/2007/11/27/who-s-rioting-in-france.aspx Anyway, as all of my readers know, the rioters on the outskirts of Paris are young Muslims. (They are not rioting because of what the Israelis are doing or not doing to the Palestinians.) They are rioting against France and the French …

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France: An Echo of the 2005 [MUSLIMS, ARABS] Riots?

November 27, 2007

France: An Echo of the 2005 Riots?
From: http://www.stratfor.com/products/premium/read_article.php?id=298854
November 26, 2007 16 23 GMT
Dozens of youths in the slum of Villiers-le-Bel in northern Paris set two police stations on fire Nov. 24. The rioting was triggered by the deaths of two teenagers who stole a motorcycle and collided with a police vehicle. Authorities have already boosted security in the region, but there have been reports of looting and minor attacks targeting shops, passersby and cars. Witnesses reportedly saw Molotov cocktails being prepared for more violence the night of Nov. 25.

This incident and response looks eerily like the start of the November 2005 riots which started when two youths were electrocuted while fleeing from police. Those were the largest urban riots seen in France in 40 years.

Though French media are reporting the riots, news reports have omitted that the suburb where they are taking place, Villiers-le-Bel, is a Muslim slum. The 2005 riots began in a similar neighborhood, Clichy-sous-Bois, but spread for weeks to nearly all the suburbs of every major metropolitan region in France.

With more than 5 million Muslims living in France — 70 percent of them from France’s former colonies of Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia — Islam has become the country’s second-largest religion. Though Muslims make up 10 percent of the French population, not a single Muslim sits in the French Parliament. French suburbs, which are in effect Arab Muslim slums, have the country’s highest crime and unemployment rates. French Muslim leaders also assert that racism and discrimination are the root causes of the marginalization that results in high unemployment and thus crime among the Muslim minority. The previous French government did not address these issues, and the current French government has no plans to address them either.

The next few nights will indicate whether this current round of social unrest will ignite as quickly and spread as widely as the riots in 2005. French President Nicolas Sarkozy was interior minister when the last riots erupted, and he took quite a lot of flack for failing to rein in the violence and for spouting off derogatory comments about Muslims. As president, Sarkozy has already seen large labor strikes crippling France; the last thing he wants is another social group — especially one he has a history with — causing unrest. To keep the current situation from erupting, Sarkozy might use much firmer means than his predecessor. Printable Page

 

Muslims Rioting in Paris after Muslim Youths Killed

November 26, 2007


From: http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/archives/2007/11/rioting_in_paris_after_muslim_youths_killed/  

Rioting in Paris after Muslim Youths Killed Rioting has been ongoing in the Paris suburbs for hours after the deaths of two teenagers in what appears to be an accidental crash with a police vehicle.

French Muslim Riot Photo After the accident, looting broke out and the police station in Villiers-le-Bel was set on fire, as was a local petrol station, with a number of cars destroyed.
Details are a bit sketchy in the early reports.“Riot grips Paris suburb after youths killed in police crash,” AFP

French police were on alert Monday for a new flare-up of violence in the Paris suburbs, after the death of two teenagers in a crash with a police car sparked six hours of rioting by angry youths.

Gangs torched cars and looted shops and buildings in the north Paris suburb of Villiers-le-Bel, injuring 25 police officers, following the death of the youths aged 15 and 16, whose cross-country motorbike collided with a police car at around 5:00 pm (1600 GMT) on Sunday. Some 100 angry youths quickly thronged the crash site, in a flashpoint high-rise housing estate, demanding the “truth” about the accident, as rioting spread across the town.

In 2005, the accidental death of two youths allegedly fleeing police in another north Paris suburb sparked three weeks of riots in suburban estates across France, the country’s worst social unrest in decades.

Omar Sehhouli, the brother of one of Sunday’s victims, accused police of ramming the motorbike and of failing to assist the injured teens. “This is a failure to assist a person in danger… it is 100-percent a (police) blunder. They know it, and that’s why they did not stay at the scene,” he told France Info radio. “I know they will say they left because they were afraid of clashes or of being assaulted… but up until now we have had no apology from the police chief.”

Police said the bike smashed into the side of their car during a routine patrol of the neighbourhood. Neither youth was wearing a helmet, according to witnesses. An internal police investigation has been opened.

Officials reported at least seven arrests in Villiers-le-Bel as rioters torched two garages, a petrol pump and two shops, pillaged the railway station in neighbouring Arnouville and set fire to more than 20 cars. Twenty-five police were injured in the violence, two seriously, as well as one firefighter, officials said Monday. A police station Villiers-le-Bel was set on fire and another in Arnouville was wrecked. Police said there were reports of “small groups attacking shops, passers-by and car drivers” to rob them. One suspect was arrested carrying jewelry from a looted store, they said.

Sehhouli told AFP the rioting “was not violence but an expression of rage,” saying he wanted the police officers “responsible” for the accident to be brought to justice.

“Boys’ moped deaths ignite riot in Paris suburb,” London Telegraph.

French police were on alert Monday for a new flare-up of violence in the Paris suburbs, after the death of two teenagers in a crash with a police car sparked six hours of rioting by angry youths.

Gangs torched cars and looted shops and buildings in the north Paris suburb of Villiers-le-Bel, injuring 25 police officers, following the death of the youths aged 15 and 16, whose cross-country motorbike collided with a police car at around 5:00 pm (1600 GMT) on Sunday. Some 100 angry youths quickly thronged the crash site, in a flashpoint high-rise housing estate, demanding the “truth” about the accident, as rioting spread across the town.

In 2005, the accidental death of two youths allegedly fleeing police in another north Paris suburb sparked three weeks of riots in suburban estates across France, the country’s worst social unrest in decades.

Interestingly, those without background knowledge of the 2005 riots would have no idea from reading these stories that the “youths” killed, those perpetrating the riots, and the suburbs in question were predominantly Muslim and that ethnic unrest was the tinder sparked by the incidents. Indeed, there’s no clue in either story other than the name of the brother, Omar Sehhouli, who is quoted in both pieces and this, in the 17th paragraph of the AFP report:

Police and politicians warn many French suburbs remain a “tinderbox” two years after riots which exposed France’s failure to fully integrate the French-born descendants of African and Arab immigrants.

Rather important information, no? One can’t imagine rioting and the throwing of Molotov cocktails at police in most Western suburbs as a result of an accident. Surely, some explanation is warranted.

Photo credit: BBC