Posts Tagged ‘Tunisia’

‘Arab Spring’: The chilly cruel winter reality of Arab racism and Islamic bigotry

October 23, 2011

‘Arab Spring’: The chilly cruel winter reality of Arab racism and Islamic bigotry

Not that ethnic racism and religious bigotry weren’t rampant before the so-called “Arab spring” sprung about. But the intolerance tide seems to be only worsening, and without an Arab dictator to “hold” various factions together, vulnerability expand, risks rise.

RELIGIOUS BIGOTRY:

As the D.B. puts it: “Violence Against Egypt’s Copts in an Intolerant Arab Spring.. The elephant in the room of the Arab Spring is now the mistreatment of minority communities—Christians and others—across the Arab world.”

FPM asks: Hillary Clinton Promises to Save Egypt’s Christians? … the guise of the “Arab spring” and “people-power,” all hailed and supported by the U.S.—worked for religious minorities in the Arab world?

In Feb. Diana West wrote: “Islamic bigotry kept under wraps in Egyptian uprising.” Especially at the brutalization and racist rape by Arab Muslim mob in Egypt of CBS journalist L. Logan (thinking she was Jewish) and the MSM silencing the story.

In May, the New York Times reported on the growing Islamic anti-Christian attacks: “Egypt’s Christians Fear Violence as Changes Embolden Islamists.” That “Coptic Christians, many of whom have felt less secure since Egypt’s dictator stepped down, held a sit-in May 19 in Cairo.”

Explaining: The revolution has empowered the majority but also opened new questions about the protection of minority rights like freedom of religion or expression as Islamist groups step forward to lay out their agendas and test their political might.

Adding:
Around the region, Christians are also closely watching events in Syria, where as in Egypt Christians and other minorities received the protection of a secular dictator, Bashar al-Assad, now facing his own popular uprising.

Z. Baumann, in a June article, asks about Christians: “Arab Spring’s losers of revolution?”

Christian Persecution monitor (Aug.) “Common Fear, Opposing Reactions Define Differences between Christians in Egypt and Syria.”
Later on, in that month:
Egyptian Islamic Jihad Official: If We Come To Power We Will Launch Islamic Conquest To Instate Sharia and “Exterminate” Christians If They Cause Problems.

The Copts Association and Christian of Iraq said (Sep.) The Arab Spring and Christian Persecution… Throughout the region, Christians have been targeted by Muslim mobs … that the Arab Spring is posing a threat to Christian minorities throughout the Middle East.

As the Arab Islamic mob (Sep.) attacked the Israeli embassy in Cairo, they were justifiably described by a Western journalist. “They Were Animals.” Still think, the Arab-Israeli conflict is about “land…?”

ETHNIC RACISM

Introduction:
From a 2006 article in The Guardian: “The race taboo,”: The existence of racist attitudes within Arab countries is often denied, resulting in scandalous displays of prejudice against certain ethnic groups. The Arab countries, mostly are in denial. The A to Z of ethnic and religious groups in the Middle East embraces Alawites, Armenians, Assyrians, Baha’is, Berbers, Chaldeans, Copts, Druzes, Ibadis, Ismailis, Jews, Kurds, Maronites, Sahrawis, Tuareq, Turkmen, Yazidis and Zaidis (by no means an exhaustive list), and yet serious discussion of ethnic/religious diversity and its place in society is a long-standing taboo.
If the existence of non-Arab or non-Muslim groups is acknowledged at all, it is usually only to declare how wonderfully everyone gets along.

In April this year, indingenous group who suffer discrimination: Tunisia’s Berbers test the limits of country’s newfound freedoms

Probably most noted group of non-Arabs to suffer from Arab racism are blacks.

Already in March, Rebels execute black immigrants while forces kidnap others… Therefore the Arab racism of Libyan rebels constitute crimes against humanity.

From NER, March 10 “Arab Racism On Display In Libya.”

From a Mar 5, 2011 “Black Africans Caught in Libyan Arab Racism” That Libyan rebels, overwhelmingly racist and anti-African…

The New York Times reported in September: “Libyans Turn Wrath on Dark-Skinned Migrants,” That As rebel leaders pleaded with their fighters to avoid taking revenge against “brother Libyans,” many rebels were turning their wrath against migrants from sub-Saharan Africa, imprisoning hundreds for the crime of fighting as “mercenaries” for Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi without any evidence except the color of their skin.
Explaining the scapefoating of black: Still, in a country with a long history of racist violence, it has become an article of faith among supporters of the Libyan rebels that African mercenaries pervaded the loyalists’ ranks. And since Colonel Qaddafi’s fall from power, the hunting down of people suspected of being mercenaries has become a major preoccupation.

Even the Arab-based Arab-biased al-Jazeera reported testimonies of “how race-based discrimination and violence, long an issue in Libya, had been inflamed by the war.”

From the HuffingtonPost, September “The Great Taboo: Arab Racism,” With the liberation of Libya come less happy reports from Amnesty and Physicians for Human Rights of rebels slaughtering scores of black Africans, believing they were all pro-Gaddafi mercenaries. While the dictator did hire some fighters from sub-Saharan Africa, the vast majority of black Africans in Libya are entirely innocent immigrants, one million of whom are guest workers.

Tarek Fatah (October) on “The future of the Arab Spring”

I’m very pessimistic about the Arab world… I think there will be far more chaos than Obama can manage. There’s nothing there. The Muslim Brotherhood and the Islamists have billions of dollars. The jean-clad, western secularists have to worry about their girlfriends, and their New York Yankee hats and every silly stuff, and Twitter and Facebook. While the real world is moving on. All these guys will come back to New York, and Boston, and Toronto and say, ‘Oh, we went there for sabbatical and had fun in Cairo.’ While the Muslim Brotherhood is deeply entrenched. Not a single black face in all of Arab Spring. What does it say to you? 20% of the Arab population is black, but you can’t see a single black face. It’s a completely racist movement. It says non-Arabs in the Arab Spring have no rights. IF you’re Bangladeshi, Filipino, Indonesian…you have absolutely no rights. This is worse Apartheid. That’s why Africans are fleeing Libya, dying in the Mediterranean, to get to Italy or to Israel.

On the plight of Africans in Arab Egypt, UNHCR (October) says no more resettlement for refugees from Libya in Egypt…‎ For the Africans now stranded in Egypt, Ali, a Somali refugee who has been waiting for nearly a decade to be relocated, he warns that there will be an upsurge in anti-Africanism and racism toward the refugees who are barred from work and education in the country.

Black activists in October decried: “Why The New York Times Ignored Libya Ethnic Cleansing‎… Not Genocide If “Our Team” Commits the Crime.”

When a major newspaper supports so-called “rebels,” even though the signs are abundant from the very beginning that they comprise sadistic killers, radical Islamists, and anti-Black racists, what does it do at the end of the day, when the evidence can’t be hidden anymore that the so-called “liberators” are in fact genocidal killers?
[…] Complicity is widely shared. Not even the first African American president of the United States, Barack Obama, has condemned the targeted killings of Black Libyans. Not a word of condemnation from Hillary Clinton, Secretary of State, who is in Tripoli today. Nothing from United Nations Secretary General Ban ki-Moon and the ICC’s Ocampo.

Carina Ray (Sep.): “Gaddafi and the Mercenary Myth‎.” The mistreatment and murder of blacks by rebel forces in Libya is an extension of long-simmering anti-immigrant sentiments that are directed at sub-Saharan Africans. Xenophobia and racism are both at play here.

In that month: Persecution of Black Libyans draws international outcry‎
Workers World. They must protest the racist persecution of Black Libyans and all Africans and demand that it stop immediately.

A Sep. report: “Poverty Skyrockets in the World’s Poorest Country Due to Racial Violence After Revolution in Neighboring Libya.”

Niger is the poorest country in Africa and the world: Many of its people go hungry every day, many children die before their fifth birthday, and countless thousands have died in past famines. Now, it’s getting much poorer, as black migrant workers from Niger are forced to leave neighboring Libya because of the color of their skin in the aftermath of the revolution there. Workers used to send money home to Niger from Libya, enabling impoverished family members to survive. But now these workers have been forced to leave Libya, where some black migrant workers were lynched, and many others have been rounded up and jailed in appalling conditions after being falsely accused of being mercenaries for the brutal, recently-ousted dictator Muammar el-Qaddafi…
Still, in a country with a long history of racist violence, it has become an article of faith among supporters of the Libyan rebels that African mercenaries…

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Arab spring – The Arab apartheid system is exposing itself

June 29, 2011

Arab Spring Gusher‎
Northumberland Today – Wally Keeler – [June 28, 2011]

Arabs take to the streets in the hundreds of thousands. They have suffered suppression, oppression, repression, for generations of family dictatorships. Security forces machine-gun the ‘flowering popular movement.’ Tanks and howitzers shell the residences of the ‘flowering popular movement.’ Mourners are gunned down, children are tortured and murdered, dissidents decapitated or mutilated. Women are gang raped. Refugees by the thousands flee. Tens of thousands are homeless. Islamist buzzards circle over the political chaos. The Arab apartheid system is exposing itself.

http://www.northumberlandtoday.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3191144

Islamofascism, the Internet, and the liberty contagion

February 23, 2011

Islamofascism, the Internet, and the liberty contagion | Richmond Times-Dispatch

By ROSS MACKENZIE
Published: February 20, 2011

On Egypt et al. let us be very clear.

Joy at the expansion of liberty — maybe even of democracy — is the only defensible sentiment. Any policy based on regime stability alone (as American foreign policy has been based too long) and thereby sanctioning tyranny, autocracy, one-party rule — is based on a premise not only indefensible but false.

The American left went bonkers over George W. Bush’s “Freedom Agenda,” which morphed into a “Freedom Doctrine.” Much of the left never accepted Bush as a legitimate president following the Supreme Court’s ruling about the Florida count in the 2000 election — and so the left could not accept anything he did. Yet it was he who insisted on encouraging democracy to germinate and grow in Iraq, in the hope it might spread throughout the Middle East.

So here we are, with freedom demonstrations from the southern Mediterranean littoral to beyond the Persian Gulf in, even, Iran. Is this apparent contagion a consequence — in a paradigmatic Internet hour — of infectious liberty, and correspondingly eloquent testimony to the fragility of autocratic regimes both Arab and Persian? At almost light-speed, the Internet may have disassembled fascist mullah rule across the Muslim world. Can you not hear — in the streets from Algiers to Tehran — liberty’s alluring song?

Maybe. And maybe not.

Islamofascism is our century’s Soviet communism. It seeks worldwide rule (a global caliphate) achieved and sustained through terror. In Iran, during the Carter administration, the shah fell. Freedom was thick in the air. Then Khomeini took over. Today freedom lies crushed, al-Qaida and the Taliban have sprouted, and Iran has satellized first Gaza (through Hamas) and now Lebanon (through Hezbollah). Syria remains in Iran’s orbit, and Turkey nudges seemingly ever closer.

Now in Egypt, during an Obama administration boasting a foreign policy no less befuddled, ideological, and incompetent than Carter’s, Mubarak is out. Were the Tahrir Square demonstrations genuinely spontaneous? Did his fall just happen, the demonstrators emboldened and enabled by the Internet? Or were those at Tahrir mere marionettes manipulated by an Islamofascist Muslim Brotherhood?

The ‘Hood traces back to a late 1920s founding and to early training by Nazi goons. Many of its alumni are — or were — al-Qaida stars. It helped establish Hamas, which it and Iran still sustain. The ‘Hood’s Supreme Guide, one Mohamed Badi, insists his group will “continue to raise the banner of jihad” against Jews — in his words the ‘Hood’s “first and foremost enemies.” He hates America, signifies for targeting U.S. troops, deplores “Zio-American arrogance and tyranny,” and seeks for Egypt creation of an Islamist state.

Such lovelies could have arranged the demonstrations in Cairo and across the Muslim world. Or they may have been as surprised by those demonstrations as the Obamians were. In either case, as Egypt’s most efficient, disciplined, and stabilizing (there’s that word again) force besides the military, the Muslim Brotherhood may be perfectly positioned to satellize Egypt — thereby advancing the Islamist territorial imperative, not to mention the Iranian dream.

Perhaps it’s true: The Internet may be a liberating tool unimagined just a generation ago. In its face, possibly not even the most ruthless of regimes can survive. Or perhaps in liberating a people subjugated in poverty (at $6,200 per year, per-capita Egyptian income ranks behind Bosnia, Jamaica and Cuba), the Internet liberates only to invite more terrifying subjugation by Islamist cut-throats — as with communist cadres — waiting to rush from the shadows into the corridors of power.

Liberty is of course the ultimate cause. Always. Before our eyes, we may be seeing it blossom — so greatly fertilized by the Internet — throughout the Muslim world. Then again, terrorizing Islamists may move in and capture these revolutions, converting them at the muzzles of guns, Maoist-like, into perversions of democracy that allow one man one vote — once.

That would be the worst sort of outcome. Still, it would enable a blame-mongering American left to unload once again on George Bush, its perceived illegitimate president who planted freedom in the Muslim world, for the perverted, illegitimate democracy his “Freedom Agenda” ultimately wrought.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/news/2011/feb/20/tdopin02-islamofascism-the-internet-and-the-libert-ar-853882/

Update on ‘Turmoil on oppressive Arab-Muslim M.E.’ Feb. 16, 2011

February 16, 2011

Turmoil in the Middle East since January, 2011, starting off with Tunisia.
(a)In Egypt, at the beginning of February, the ‘Muslim Brotherhood’ tries to hijack the “revolution,” * calling for war with Israel *.

(b) Some US journalists are severely beaten, accused of being “Israeli spies.”* Some terrorism also reported there.*
(c) At the celebration of the fall of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, a racist Arab Muslim mob of 200 attacked and sexually assaulted CBS’ 60 Minutes reporter Lara Logan, while yelling “Jew!, Jew!”*

(d) Protests spread to other oppressive dictatorship in the Arab-Muslim Middle East such as: Iran, Syria, Yemen, Libya, Bahrain, etc.* Iranian Islamic Republic [typically] cracks down with harsh brutality.*

Egyptian protester: We don’t want Muslim Brotherhood to ‘hijack’ our protests

Kerry Picket
Published on February 3, 2011

The protests in Egypt have become more intense as acts of violence by pro-Mubarak have reportedly infiltrated the massive gathering of individuals speaking out against the Hosni Mubarak government. I interviewed a young Egyptian protester by phone on Wednesday. Cynthia Farahat is an Egyptian dissident who described herself as a “conservative in the American sense of the word.” She told me that supporters of Mubarak are stirring up violence by assaulting those who are protesting the government.

“I had joined the protest myself, and I have seen an extraordinary display of peace and civility that I never expected to see in a third world in Arab Islamic country. I was overwhelmed by the display of peaceful protesters and the tolerance. It was actually amazing,” she explained.

“My friends are there. Mubarak’s side attacked them today. I couldn’t get to Tahrir. I tried to go but, they closed all entrances to Tahrir Square, and many of my friends said because I am a girl and I have a political history, I might be targeted there. So they refused to let me go, but they are being attacked right now, and some people called me with Molotov cocktails [who are] Mubarak supporters,” she said.

“Most of these people are policemen. They are secret police. They caught them. They checked their IDs. Some of them of course not all of them,” she said. ” They were handed to the military who kept them in a government building until they can do something about it.”

It seems the Muslim Brotherhood wasted no time in taking advantage of the chaos in Egypt right now. It was difficult at first to see who was fueling the protests, as Brotherhood supporters were apparently small in numbers in the street protests but their long-time organized influenced, despite their opposition to the Mubarak, behind the scenes at higher levels remains a concern on Capitol Hill.

“My worry is that [the Muslim Brotherhood] are a very large organization and they could be exercising a more influence than what you see in front of the CNN cameras. It’s an organization that’s spawned three other terrorist organizations–Islamic Jihad, Al-Qaeda, and Hamas,” Senator Mark Kirk, Illinois Republican, told me on Wednesday night. “We don’t know the names of the leaders as well as we should, which is why I gave the speech on the floor–to go through who the top leader of guidance is and then what he said about the West and Sharia law.”

“[The Muslim Brotherhood] was one of my major concerns. When the 25th of January protests started, I was,ironically, one of the people who were very apprehensive about it and not encouraging it in anyway, because the media was everywhere, and the West and in Egypt were trying to portray it as a movement that was coming out of Islamists,” said Cynthia. So I was among the people who refused to go on the first days. I was very apprehensive about the nature of these protests. Later, my perspective completely changed, because I have seen video of my friends and my colleagues protesting. The Muslim Brotherhood had a very insignificant almost no presence in the protest at all.”

Ms. Farahat added that not only was the Brotherhood small in numbers but were also rejected by protesters she saw.

“The Muslim Brotherhood, and I saw it the other day—I was watching, they tried to recite the slogan ‘Islam is the solution, and they were attacked by the rest of the protesters and forced to shut-up. They were just asked to shut-up. It wasn’t about the Muslim Brotherhood. [The protesters] were not going to allow [the Brotherhood] to hijack the diverse event.”

Ms. Farahat believes opposition groups like the Muslim Brotherhood, which was organized in 1928 and known to have ties to groups engaging in terrorist activity, are not popular in Egypt.

“When a few of the Islamic crowds try to break the protests to pray theywere rejected by the rest of the protesters. Rejecting a prayer is a very unusual sight in an Islamic country. The protesters sort of look at the Muslim Brotherhood as part of the opposition of Mubarak’s regime,” she explained.

“The significant thing is the opposition is almost totally rejected by most of the protesters, and they are seen as players with the Mubarak regime. That’s why they are refused any conversation or any dialogue with the new vice president Omar Suleiman…because they are trying to gain popularity among the masses .”

However, Senator Kirk cautions that history shows the power that eventually takes over the environment seen in Egypt today is usually absent among the crowds of people making demands in the streets.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/blog/watercooler/2011/feb/3/egyptian-protester-we-dont-want-muslim-brotherhood/

Jerusalem Issue Briefs-The Muslim Brotherhood and the Egyptian Crisis

The Muslim Brotherhood and the Egyptian Crisis

Dore Gold

[Vol. 10, No. 26 2 February 2011]

  • Will the Obama administration's policy toward Egypt be based on a perception that the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood would be extremely dangerous? Or have they taken the position – voiced in parts of the U.S. foreign policy establishment – that the Brotherhood has become moderate and can be talked to? Initial administration reactions indicate that it does not rule out Muslim Brotherhood participation in a future Egyptian coalition government.
  • Since January 28, the Muslim Brotherhood's involvement has become more prominent, with its support of Mohamed ElBaradei to lead the opposition forces against the government. In the streets of Cairo, Muslim Brotherhood demonstrators disdainfully call people like ElBaradei “donkeys of the revolution” (hamir al-thawra) – to be used and thenpushed away – a scenario that sees the Muslim Brotherhoodexploit ElBaradei in order to hijack the Egyptian revolution at a later stage.
  • There has been a great deal of confusion about the Muslim Brotherhood.In the years after it was founded in 1928, it developed a “secret apparatus” that engaged in political terrorism against Egyptian Copts as well as government officials. In December 1948, the Muslim Brotherhood assassinated Egyptian Prime Minister Mahmoud al-Nuqrashi Pasha. It also sought to kill Egyptian leader Abdul Nasser in October 1954.
  • Former Brotherhood Supreme Guide Muhammad Akef declared in 2004 his “complete faith that Islam will invade Europe and America.” In 2001, the Muslim Brotherhood's publication in London, Risalat al-Ikhwan, featured at the top of its cover page the slogan: “Our Mission: World Domination.” This header was changed after 9/11.
  • The current Supreme Guide, Muhammad Badi', gave a sermon in September 2010 stating that “the improvement and change that the [Muslim] nation seeks can only be attained through jihad and sacrifice and by raising a jihadi generation that pursues death, just as the enemies pursue life.”

Initially, it was widely observed that the Muslim Brotherhood has been very low-key during the current crisis in Egypt. Most analysts admitted that it is the best organized and largest opposition group in Egypt, but they played down its role. Yet since January 28, the Muslim Brotherhood's involvement has become more prominent.  One tangible example is the support the Brotherhood has given to Mohamed ElBaradei to lead the opposition forces against the government.

In the streets of Cairo, Muslim Brotherhood demonstrators disdainfully call people like ElBaradei “donkeys of the revolution” (hamir al-thawra), to be used and then pushed away.1 Thus, there is a scenario that sees the Muslim Brotherhood exploit a figure like ElBaradei in order to hijack the Egyptian revolution at a later stage.

What is the Muslim Brotherhood? It is known as Ikhwan al-Muslimun in Arabic, or just Ikhwan, established in 1928 by an Egyptian schoolteacher, Hassan al-Banna. Outwardly, it was a social and religious organization, but over the years it developed a “secret apparatus” that engaged in military training of its cadres and political terrorism against Egyptian Copts as well as government officials. This dualism continued years later. In December 1948, the Muslim Brotherhood assassinated Egyptian Prime Minister Mahmoud al-Nuqrashi Pasha. It also sought to kill Egyptian leader Abdul Nasser in October 1954.

The Muslim Brotherhood also had an expansionist agenda right from the start, and called for the re-establishment of the Islamic Empire. In the late 1930s, its newspaper called for retaking “former Islamic colonies” in Andalus (Spain), southern Italy, and the Balkans.2 This theme was maintained in recent years by its former Supreme Guide, Muhammad Akef, who in 2004 declared his “complete faith that Islam will invade Europe and America,” with the caveat that Westerners will join Islam by conviction.3 Others have also made this point. According to Sheikh Yousef Qaradawi, widely regarded as the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood:

Constantinople was conquered in 1453 by a 23-year-old Ottoman named Muhammad ibn Murad, whom we call Muhammad the Conqueror. Now what remains is to conquer Rome. That is what we wish for, and that is what we believe in. After having been expelled twice, Islam will be victorious and reconquer Europe….I am certain that this time, victory will be won not by the sword but by preaching.4

Over the years, the Muslim Brotherhood opened branches in a number of Arab countries and even has front organizations in the UK, France, and the U.S. But it has not disavowed its original commitment to Islamic militancy and its global ambitions. For example, the Muslim Brotherhood's publication in London, Risalat al-Ikhwan, has maintained a clearly jihadist orientation; in 2001 it featured at the top of its cover page the slogan: “Our Mission: World Domination” (siyadat al-dunya). This header was changed after 9/11, but the publication still carries the Muslim Brotherhood's motto which includes: “Jihad is our path; martyrdom is our aspiration.”5

The current Supreme Guide of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Muhammad Badi', gave a sermon in September 2010 stating that Muslims today “need to understand that the improvement and change that the [Muslim] nation seeks can only be attained through jihad and sacrifice and by raising a jihadi generation that pursues death, just as the enemies pursue life.”6 In short, the Muslim Brotherhood remains committed to supporting militant activities in order to advance its political aims. From looking at the biographies of its most prominent graduates, one can immediately understand the organization's long-term commitment to jihadism:

1.     Abdullah Azzam (of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood) and Muhammad Qutb (of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood) taught at King Abdul Aziz University in Jidda, Saudi Arabia, where they had a student named Osama bin Laden. Azzam went off to Pakistan with his student, bin Laden, to help the mujahidin fight the Soviets in Afghanistan.

2.     Ayman al-Zawahiri (bin Laden's deputy) grew up in the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood.

3.     Khalid Sheikh Muhammad (the al-Qaeda mastermind of the 9/11 attacks) came out of the Kuwaiti Muslim Brotherhood.

Given this background, the Muslim Brotherhood has been widely regarded in the Arab world as the incubator of the jihadist ideology.  A former Kuwaiti Minister of Education, Dr. Ahmad Al-Rab'i, argued in Al-Sharq al-Awsat on July 25, 2005, that the founders of most modern terrorist groups in the Middle East emerged from “the mantle” of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Many columnists in the Middle East have warned in recent years about the Brotherhood's hostile intentions. Tariq Hasan, a columnist for the Egyptian government daily Al-Ahram, alerted his readers on June 23, 2007, that the Muslim Brotherhood was preparing a violent takeover in Egypt, using its “masked militias” in order to replicate the Hamas seizure of power in the Gaza Strip. And columnist Hussein Shobokshi, writing in the Saudi-owned Al-Sharq al-Awsat on October 23, 2007, said that “to this day” the Muslim Brotherhood “has brought nothing but fanaticism, divisions, and extremism, and in some cases bloodshed and killings.” Thus, both Arab regimes and leading opinion-makers in Arab states still have serious reservations about the claim of a new moderation in the Muslim Brotherhood.7

Ironically, in the last five years, prominent voices in the West have considered opening a political dialogue with the Muslim Brotherhood. For example, Dr. Robert S. Leiken and Steven Brooke published an article in the March-April 2007 issue of Foreign Affairs called “The Moderate Muslim Brotherhood” in which they advised the Bush administration to enter into a strategic alliance with the organization, which they referred to as “moderate,” calling it a “notable opportunity” to use the Brotherhood to promote American interests. James Traub echoed many of their arguments in the New York Times Magazine on April 29, 2007, in which he claimed that “the Muslim Brotherhood, for all its rhetorical support of Hamas, could well be precisely the kind of moderate Islamic body that the administration says it seeks.” In addition, a committee in the British House of Commons also advocated the UK opening a dialogue with the Muslim Brotherhood, as well.

At the same time, some U.S. officials and dignitaries seemed to have softened their approach to the Muslim Brotherhood. In 2005, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice pressed President Mubarak to open up participation in the Egyptian parliamentary elections, resulting in a major increase of elected Muslim Brotherhood members from 15 to 88. Subsequently, Mubarak became more reluctant to take U.S. advice.

Visiting U.S. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer met twice in 2007 with the head of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood's parliamentary bloc, Mohammed Saad el-Katatni, according to Brotherhood spokesman Hamdi Hassan.

The critical question is whether the Obama administration's policy toward Egypt will be based on a perception that the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood would be extremely dangerous. Or have they taken the position – voiced in parts of the U.S. foreign policy establishment – that the Muslim Brotherhood has become moderate and can be talked to? The initial reactions of the Obama administration indicate that it does not rule out Muslim Brotherhood participation in a future Egyptian coalition government.8 Unfortunately, there is a dangerous misconception about the Muslim Brotherhood in parts of the foreign policy community in the West that could affect calculations in Washington and London in the weeks ahead.
http://www.jcpa.org/JCPA/Templates/ShowPage.asp?DBID=1&LNGID=1&TMID=111&FID=442&PID=0&IID=5953

Muslim Brotherhood: ‘Prepare Egyptians for War With Israel’ Feb 1, 2011 … A leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt told the Arabic-language Iranian news network Al-Alam on Monday that he would like to …

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/Muslim-Brotherhood-war-Israel/2011/02/01/id/384603

Muslim Brotherhood Wants War With Israel – Forex Crunch Jan 31, 2011 … Mohamed Ghanem, one of the leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, calls Egypt to stop pumping gas to Israel and prepare the Egyptian …

http://www.forexcrunch.com/muslim-brotherhood-wants-war-with-israel/

“Severely Beaten” Fox News Reporters Were Accused Of Being Israeli Spies… Feb 3, 2011 … Now a source close to the network has told The Wrap that the pair was attacked because they were accused of being Israeli spies, and the two …

http://www.businessinsider.com/fox-news-reporter-israeli-spies-mubarak-cairo-video-2011-2

Injured Fox News Reporters Accused of Being ‘Israeli Spies’ in …Feb 3, 2011 … Injured Fox News Reporters Accused of Being ‘Israeli Spies’ in Egypt … and ran right into the pro Mubarak crowd and were severely beaten. …

http://tv.msn.com/tv/article.aspx?news=626798&affid=100055

CBS News reporter Lara Logan beaten, sexually assaulted during Cairo celebration



By Paul Farhi

Washington Post Staff Writer

Tuesday, February 15, 2011; 8:37 PM



CBS News said in a statement Logan was covering the celebrations for CBS’s “60 Minutes” program on February 11 when she and her team were surrounded by “a mob of more than 200 people whipped into a frenzy.”
“In the crush of the mob, she was separated from her crew. She was surrounded and suffered a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating before being saved by a group of women and an estimated 20 Egyptian soldiers,” CBS said.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/15/us-egypt-journalists-idUSTRE71E76I20110215



CBS reporter’s Cairo nightmare – NYPOST.com

Feb 16, 2011 … “60 Minutes” correspondent Lara Logan was repeatedly sexually assaulted by thugs yelling, “Jew! Jew!” as she covered the chaotic fall of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo’s main square Friday.
http://www.nypost.com/p/news/international/cbs_reporter_cairo_nightmare_pXiUVvhwIDdCrbD95ybD5N



Egyptians Yelled ‘Jew! Jew!’ While Sexually Assaulting CBS …Feb 16, 2011 …
“60 Minutes” correspondent Lara Logan was repeatedly sexually assaulted by thugs yelling, “Jew! Jew!” as she covered the chaotic fall of Egyptian President

http://nation.foxnews.com/lara-logan/2011/02/16/egyptians-yelled-jew-jew-while-sexually-assaulting-cbs-reporter-lara-logan

CBS Reporter Sexually Assaulted In Egypt
February, 16, 2011
Egypt – CBS reporter Lara Logan sustained a “brutal and sustained” sexual assault by an Egyptian mob of men while covering the protests in Cairo. …News One

http://newsone.com/world/newsonestaff2/cbs-lara-logan-raped-Egypt/


Prison break, looting, violence in Cairo as anti-government …‎
Herald Sun – Jan 30, 2011
Three other people were killed on Saturday in Cairo, three in Rafah on the border with Gaza, and five in Ismailia, on the west bank of the Suez Canal.
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/world/looting-engulfs-cairo/story-e6frf7lf-1225997039828


Egypt shuts Gaza border as militants break out of jail‎
Reuters – Nidal al-Mughrabi – Ori Lewis – Jan 30, 2011
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/01/30/uk-palestinians-egypt-gaza-idUKTRE70T35I20110130


Egyptian anti-government demonstrators face army tanks on Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Feb 5.
Egypt ruling party leaders resign
Blast rocks gas terminal in Sinai


[…]
Blast
An explosion rocked a gas terminal in Egypt’s northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, setting off a massive fire that was contained by shutting off the flow of gas to neighboring Jordan and Israel, officials and witnesses said.
Egypt’s natural gas company said the fire was caused by a gas leak. However, a local security official said an explosive device was detonated inside the terminal, and the regional governor, Abdel Wahab Mabrouk, said he suspected sabotage.
The blast and fire at the gas terminal in the Sinai town of El-Arish did not cause casualties. The explosion sent a pillar of flames leaping into the sky, but was a safe distance from the nearest homes, said Mabrouk.
The blast came as a popular uprising engulfed Egypt, where anti-government protesters have been demanding the ouster of longtime President Hosni Mubarak for the past two weeks. The Sinai Peninsula, home to Bedouin tribesmen, has been the scene of clashes between residents and security forces. It borders both Israel and the Gaza Strip, ruled by the Islamic militant Hamas.
The terminal is part of a pipeline system that transports gas from Egypt’s Port Said on the Mediterranean Sea to Israel, Syria and Jordan.
The head of Egypt’s natural gas company, Magdy Toufik, said in a statement that the fire broke out in the terminal “as a result of a small amount of gas leaking.”
However, a senior security official said an explosive device was detonated in the terminal. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the issue with reporters.
[…]


Church
A Coptic church in the Egyptian town of Rafah bordering the Gaza Strip was in flames on Saturday, with witnesses reporting a blast although a local official denied an explosion was the cause.
Witnesses said they saw flames coming out of the Mar Girgis church in Rafah after hearing an explosion. Armed men on motorbikes were spotted near the church, one of them said.
North Sinai’s governor Abdel Wahab Mabruk, however, denied on state television there had been any explosion in Mar Girgis.
The church had been left without police guards at the time of the fire, witnesses said, after security forces disappeared en masse amid nationwide rallies calling for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak.
Security is usually in place around Christian places of worship after several attacks against Copts and had been boosted after a bombing in Alexandria at the turn of the year.
http://www.arabtimesonline.com/NewsDetails/tabid/96/smid/414/ArticleID/165225/t/Egypt-ruling-party-leaders-resign/Default.aspx




Arab states rocked by the mouse that roared‎
Sydney Morning Herald – Jan 21, 2011


… in communist regimes or ossified dictatorships like Syria and Tunisia”. ….the oppressed locals… Iraq and Afghanistan have proved that invasion is a costly and difficult way to effect change. As they stand today, the MENA countries reveal that cozying up to despots and writing billion-dollar cheques for those that don’t have the people’s oil to steal, creates more problems than it solves for the reformist-minded. Inevitably, change must come from within but the oppressed should not be made to fight with one hand tied behind their backs, with Washington and other foreign capitals turning their backs because of their own vested interest.


The Egyptian-born writer Mona Eltahawy is eloquent on this: “Not once in my 43 years have I thought that I’d see an Arab leader toppled by his people. It is nothing short of poetic justice that it was neither Islamists nor invasion-in-the-name-of-democracy that sent the waters rushing on to Ben Ali’s ship but, rather, the youth of his country.”
http://www.smh.com.au/world/arab-states-rocked-by-the-mouse-that-roared-20110121-19zyo.html?from=smh_sb


As Egypt uprising inspires Middle East, Iran sees biggest protests …
February 14, 2011
By Thomas Erdbrink and Liz Sly TEHRAN – Violent protests erupted in Iran, Yemen and Bahrain on Monday as the revolutionary fervor unleashed by the toppling …
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/14/AR2011021405301.html?hpid=topnews


Quest for human dignity drives unrest in Mideast‎
Honolulu Star-Advertiser – Ira Zunin – 12 February 2011


Within days protests began in Yemen, Jordan, Algeria, Bahrain and Libya. Syria is on edge…
 totalitarian figures who might be made into reliable, sovereign allies but who are also oppressive to their own people.
http://www.staradvertiser.com/columnists/healthandmoney/20110212_quest_for_human_dignity_drives_unrest_in_mideast.html


Middle East/N. Africa | Human Rights Watch
Feb 15, 2011 … Discrimination and Violence against Sexual Minorities in Iran … Bahraini authorities should order security forces to halt attacks on …
http://www.hrw.org/en/middle-east/n-africa


Live: Mid-East protests
Page last updated at 09:35 GMT, Wednesday, 16 February 2011


Libya, Bahrain and Iran are the latest countries to be hit by popular protests inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. Follow our minute-by-minute coverage of all the latest events across the Middle East and North Africa, where several regimes are facing huge challenges from their people.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/9399009.stm


Obama Warns Autocratic Rulers: ‘World Is Changing’‎


U.S. President Barack Obama has told ‘friend and foe alike’ that they need to listen to their citizens’ calls for democracy.
February 15, 2011
By Heather Maher
http://www.rferl.org/content/obama_warns_autocrats_world_is_changing/2310597.html



Protests broken up in Iran | euronews, world news
Feb 14, 2011
http://www.euronews.net/2011/02/14/protests-broken-up-in-iran/


Iran protests see reinvigorated activists take to the streets in …
Feb 14, 2011 … Riot police and basiji militia use teargas on protesters, with reports that one demonstrator was killed in clashes.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/14/iran-protests-reinvigorated-activists


Iran Cracks Down on Spiraling Protests | News | EnglishFeb 15, 2011 … State TV showed some 50 conservative MPs marching through parliament’s main hall on Tuesday, chanting ‘Death to Mousavi, death to Karroubi.’
http://www.voanews.com/english/news/Iran-Cracks-Down-on-Spiraling-Protests-116240014.html


Iranian lawmakers: Execute opposition leaders
[February 15, 2011]
 
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Hardline Iranian lawmakers called on Tuesday for the country’s opposition leaders to face trial and be put to death, a day after clashes between opposition protesters and security forces left two people dead and dozens injured.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2011-02-15-iran-reaction-protests_N.htm


Obama lashes out at Iranian protest crackdown | World | RIA Novosti
Feb 15, 2011 … U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday criticized Iranian leaders for a brutal crackdown on anti-government protesters and praised Egypt’s …
http://en.rian.ru/world/20110215/162621174.html


Iran’s Brutal Crackdown: Join the Live Chat
CNN (blog)


Posted: February 15th, 2011 09:47 PM ET
 
Tonight a 360° exclusive. You’ll hear from a protester in Iran who’s risking her life to speak out. The Iranian government is cracking down on the demonstrations following Egypt’s uprising. That’s after they praised the people of Egypt. We’re Keeping Them Honest.
http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/2011/02/15/irans-brutal-crackdown-join-the-live-chat/


Clashes at funeral of Iran protest victim: TV | World | DAWN.COM
Feb 16, 2011 … Dawn.com
http://www.dawn.com/2011/02/16/clashes-at-funeral-of-iran-protest-victim-tv.html


Iran Protests 2011: Dramatic Videos
Feb 14, 2011 … Following revolutionary protests in Egypt, Iranians have now also begun protesting, as thousands have taken to the streets.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/14/iran-protests-2011-videos_n_823162.html

LEADING APARTHEID AND OPPRESSOR OF THE WORLD SETS UP “HUMAN RIGHTS” DIV. [OIC], LOL

April 23, 2010

LEADING APARTHEID AND OPPRESSOR OF THE WORLD SETS UP “HUMAN RIGHTS” DIV. [OIC], LOL

This BITTER JOKE is in the news:
Major Muslim group sets up human rights division 22 Apr 2010
… The Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) has announced it is setting up a special division that will deal with human rights.

http://www.jpost.com/MiddleEast/Article.aspx?id=173731


The regionalization of minority rights is most advanced within the West, in Europe and the Americas, By contrast, there is virtually no enthusiasm in Asia or the Arab/Muslim world to defelop regional norms on minortitiy rights. The whole issue remains essentially a taboo topic in many Asian and Middle Eastern countries…. Interestingly, the Organization of the Islamic Conference, representing Muslim-majority countries around the world, has a Department on Minority Affairs, but its formal resolutions focus exclusively on the rights of Muslim minorities living in non-Muslim majority countries (Khan 2002). (For representative example, see the OIC’s resolution ‘On Safeguarding the Rights of Muslim Communites and Minorities in non-OIC Member States’– Resoliution No. 1/10-MM (IS) , adopted at the 10th Session of the Islamic Summit Conference, 16-17 October-2203). The OIC has not attempted to codify norms, or to establish formal monitoring mechanisms, regarding the treatment of ethnic minorities within Muslim-majority countries, such as the oppression of the Kurds in Syria, the Ahwaz in Iran, the Hazars in Afghanistan, the Baluchs in Pakistan,the ‘Al-Akhdam’ in Yemen, or the Berbers in Algeria.

http://books.google.com/books?id=yySlh_dSElQC&pg=PA308
OIC, World’s Leading Human Rights Violators, To Set Up Own Human rights division

http://atlasshrugs2000.typepad.com/atlas_shrugs/2010/03/oichuman-rights-commission-.html

Muslim Human Rights–A Record Incompatible with the Civilized World …5 Mar 2010 … Yet despite the documents’ lofty principles, the record shows the Arab world is one of the worst offenders in the field of human rights. …

http://bsimmons.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/muslim-human-rights-a-record-incompatible-with-the-civilized-world-very-long-but-very-important/

Muslim extremist up for human-rights post 20 Apr 2010 … The Islamic legal code is enforced by religious police in Saudi Arabia and … Department has cited as one of the world’s worst abusers of human rights. … records it possesses prove a connection between CAIR and Hamas. …

http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=143545

Last year International Christian Concern placed (Muslim) Eritrea at number nine in its annual Hall of Shame. According to the ICC the intensity of persecution was “high” and “increasing.” In the ICC’s report this year the group abandoned its attempt to rank persecutors, but again included Eritrea among the worst ten. Eritrea placed among the top four in intensity of persecution, along with North Korea, Saudi Arabia, and Somalia.
http://spectator.org/archives/2010/04/02/eritrea-doubly-evil

It’s something along the line of Libya (where 2 Million Africans are oppressed because of racism) & Iran (where everyone suffers under the Islamist boot, especially minorities have a “special” treatment from the bastion of “tolerance,” like: Bahai’, Christians, Jews, Azeris, Baluchis, Ahwazis, etc.) hosting a UN conference on racism…

Arab writer admits: “We [Arabs] are racist to the bones”

April 11, 2010

Wednesday, 24 March 2010

“White Skin, Black Mask”: An Interview with Kamel Riahi

Kamel Riahi was born in the village of Al Manafikh, Tunisia, in 1974. Riahi, who is the head of the Arab Higher Institute for Translation, has recently moved back to his native Tunisia, and works as a full-time author. After having received his Masters in Arabic literature, he is currently preparing for his PhD in modern Arabic literature. He has published a number of short stories and novels, most notably The Scalpel, which won him the 2007 Comar D’Or for Arabic literature. Last November, Riahi joined four other Beirut39 participants at the inaugural ‘Nadwa’ (writers’ workshop) held by the International Prize for Arab Fiction. His texts have been translated into English, French, Italian and Hebrew. Riahi talks to Beirut39 about the racial representation of the characters in his novels, and his previous life as a nomad.

Translated from Arabic (below). Interviewed by Sousan Hammad.

Tell us more about you. When did you first start writing?

I hail from the northwest region of Tunisia, a marginalized region that suffers poverty and oblivion. Since childhood I moved between numerous jobs: I was a farmer, a pig and lizard hunter, a trafficker of cloths from Morocco, an electrician, and a bookseller in the backstreets of the capital city. I was also a traveling photographer who moved from north to south in order to capture pictures of jungle women. Later in my years I became an editor at a number of Tunisian and Arabic newspapers, and a teacher’s assistant at the University, a debater, and finally an international employee at various Arabic universities.

This journey has taught me that a human is like an idol, of whom Hemingway once said “a man can be destroyed but not defeated”. My life is full of ups and downs, an experimental life that never runs out of adventures. I answer to its appeal like a man haunted with a Jinn, playing hide-and-seek, I defeat it and it defeats me. I feel like I have a magical power that moves me to try and uncover it. I am not aware of what sort of power I may have, but it feels as if a creature larger than myself lives inside of me, struggling to break out to the world.

I started writing before I was conceived, I was in my mother’s womb, busily recording her plot to shed my blood and abort me. I struggled with all the medications and drugs she took to abort the baby, I counted her breaths.

I only started publishing in my twenties, after having lost my father.

And who are some of your most influential writers?

I am an avid reader to the point where I no longer remember who I read. I cultivate books and experiences, yet I never get influenced by anyone. I have always been myself: a complex identity yearning for independence. I love being a Bastard. I lived an orphan, and I loved being an orphan because this helped me become who I am. I have no idol, no father, no symbol and nothing is sacred.

There is a character in your novel, The Scalpel, who the narrator simply refers to as “the negro” (in Arabic as النيقرو .) At one point the narrator describes “the negro” as ‘simple and miserable’, one who reminds him of Mersault from The Stranger. Albert Camus characterized Mersault as being apathetic and alienated. These types of ‘racial’ social characterizations are similar to Ibn Khaldun’s writings. Would you say this is a deliberately placed connection?

Since I started writing fiction, I focused on the marginalized groups in Tunisia, whether socially or racially. My stories reflected the lives of the poor, the homeless, the shoe polishers, felines, young criminals, prostitutes, crushed employees, sailors and street peddlers.

I cared for the blacks in Tunisia so I tried to overcome the ideological arguments regarding them towards a psychological approach, and to show their daily suffering. The Negro in The Scalpel is a secondary character, yet he pleased my readers and nearly became the protagonist. A black man who hailed from the Tunisian countryside to became a guard at the “Jillaz” cemetery, the largest in Tunis. He is rebuked for being black. He lives a miserable life with his friend Bu-Lihya (the bearded one), both of them live in the same situation and pursue the same mystery: the case of the women’s assassinator. Both characters disappear on the same day in mysterious circumstances as if both are the two faces for the same token: one black, the other white, both of which are lost in the wilderness of the city.

You cannot judge a character by the name. This is what the novel tried to portray, since the entire novel is based on nicknames, not actual names. My novels mention no names. There’s the Negro, the bearded one, the mustached man, the Rotunda lady, the solid lady…etc. In the Arab World, a nickname ends the name.

The Negro chose to be called by this name because it reflected his color, his name did not suite him well, Saïd (The happy one), he felt alienated by that name.

My forthcoming novel will be titled The Gorilla, already one chapter has been translated into English by Peter Clark, a British translator. The protagonist will be a black man as well, and the story will uncover the (sexual) bastardness, racism and discrimination against blacks in the Arab world. Another novel I worked on, Diaries of a Slain Person, touches upon blacks in a new narrative game. These are themes that we must take into consideration, as I noticed in my many trips across the Arab world, with my careful observation, that Arabs are perfectly racist. A month ago, I was joined by a black Arab poet in Algeria, and was stunned by how she was received. All of this has confirmed to me that I am heading into the right track with this theme. Even in Tunisia, the most civilized Arab country, we still refer to whites as “free” and black as “slaves”. Blacks still suffer from being marginalized despite the fact that the law of the land and the constitution call for equality.

The name in the novel is a “wounded” name. Yet, names remain as signs that try to lead us, yet might be misleading in attempting to learn about ourselves. Saramago once said “Inside us there is something that has no name; that something is what we are.”

It might come as a surprise to you to learn that Negro was the term people called my black grandfather. I consider myself as someone of a Negro decent, although I am not black. Perhaps my wide nose proves this theory. Therefore, I am sympathetic towards the blacks ideologically, by heritage and by history. We, the whites, will not be liberated until we liberate ourselves from the racist views we have of other races and religions.

We still curse each other using “you’re Jewish” or “you’re Kurdish”, this is also racial and religious discrimination. Watch any Egyptian sitcom and tell me about the image of the Sudanese character. Listen to the Tunisian jokes about the Libyans or jokes about people from Hums in Greater Syria. Listen to the debates regarding noble families and family lineage… even horses now are divided between what is considered “noble” and what is not. We are racists to the bones. Attempting to hide or silence this fact will not help with the matter because we are a sick society which still suffers from the complexes of color and race.

http://beirut39.blogspot.com/2010/03/white-skin-black-mask-interview-with.html

More here:

http://arablit.wordpress.com/2010/03/28/kamel-riahi-on-arab-racism-writing-and-his-new-book/

Assyrians – the other victims of pan – Arabism’s racism

December 24, 2008

Assyrians – the other victims of pan – Arabism’s racism

…In the following years and the pain still piercing, Bakr Sidqi, the Baghdadi army’s chief responding to the zealous cry of the new pan-Arab fascists organised the cold blooded massacre of innocent Assyrians with the watchful eye of Imperial Britain, because they dared to ask for the recognition of the Assyrian nationality and the Assyrian cultural rights within the newly formed regime.
Betrayed and denied by Imperial Britain, the Assyrian national uprising was suppressed and the Assyrian rights’ movement was pigeonholed. For the next decades and under various successive regimes the Assyrians were known by their religion as ‘Christians’ until the ascent of the new Baathists to power in the hot summer of 1968. Then things started to change.
http://www.zindamagazine.com/html/archives/2002/7.1.02/index.php

What Happenned To the 80 Millions Assyrians After the Fall of Nineveh?
By: Paroqa D’Omta Ashoureeta
[18 April 2007]
Progenitor of Wars and Tyrannies: the Falsehood of Pan-Arabism
The deep and hidden reason of the tyrannical oppression practiced throughout the Middle East is the imposition by France and England of pan-Arabic nationalist cliques that intend to dictatorially arabize the various peoples of the Middle East, who are – all – not Arabs.
http://www.betnahrain.org/bbs/index.pl/noframes/read/15531

Husri correctly deduced that it was through education, especially children, that the “new morality” of Arabism was to be transmitted. In this endeavor, he achieved a great success. In this mission he was helped by a certain British advisor to the Iraqi Ministry of education by the name of Lionel Smith. Smith seems to have admired Husri’s passionate zeal for education, but is on record for stating that many of Husri’s “views were wrong”. Husri’s attitudes against non-Arabs seem to have been adopted by his son Khaldun al-Husri, a nationalist Arab historian who has attempted to minimize the violent destruction of the Assyrian community in Northern Iraq in the 1920s. This is reflected in:
Husri, H. (1974). The Asyyrian affair. The International Journal of Middle East Studies, 5, 161-176, 344-360.
For an account of the Assyrian tragedy consult: Stafford, R.S. (1935). The Tragedy of the Assyrians
http://www.venusproject.com/ecs/aFarrokhArab.html

Islamist Ethnic-Cleansing of Assyrians in Iraq
[August 13, 2008]
Assyrians are not seeking to re-establish Assyria, that is an unrealistic dream. Assyrians simply want to live in peace and freedom, to practice their religion, to teach their language and history. In the last 1400 years, thus has proven to be elusive, as every power that be wanted to assimilate Assyrians. We are called Arab-Christians, Iranian-Christians, Turkish-Christians and now Kurdish Christians… The Arabs had their Ba’ath ideology, with its pan-Arabism, where everyone was an Arab, even if he wasn’t
http://www.frontpagemag.com/articles/Read.aspx?GUID=D3CC0184-4CB4-48C5-9C98-1229267A8A52

Assyriac: Denied in Its Own Homeland But Accepted in England Therefore, sooner or later Assyrians in their homeland will either submit to absorption into “Pan Arabism Pot” or they will resist and be deported. …
http://www.atour.com/government/docs/20020124a.html

Assyrians and Kurds were struggling against the common oppressive Pan-Arabist regime of Saddam Hussein
http://www.aina.org/guesteds/20080416165822.htm

Is Pan-Arabism a Nationalism without a Nation?
[2007]
For a long period of time those called Arabs were the tribes living in the Arabian Peninsula… After the Islamic conquests, the number of Arabic-speakers began to rise. These new Arabic-speakers could not claim descent from the Arabs, and for many centuries they were not viewed as Arabs, nor did they consider themselves to be such.
[…]
The problem is that this totalizing theory did not present realistic and just solutions to the various conflicts that tear apart our region to this day. The policies of forced Arabization; the mistreatment of the Kurdish minority in Iraq, the oppression of the Kurds in Syria, the harassment of the Coptic minority in Egypt and the Assyrians and Chaldeans in Iraq; the provocations against what is left of the Jewish diaspora in a few countries like Yemen, Syria, and Iraq; and the intimidation and cultural negation of any minority that refuses to submit to what the peddlers of Pan-Arabism try to impose on them – all of this does nothing but generate more violence and tragedy.
If the military intervention in Iraq and the deposing of the Pan-Arabist Saddam Hussein regime has had one positive result, aside from the timid beginnings of a democratic political process, it is without doubt the fact that light has been shed on the great sectarian, linguistic, and cultural diversity with which the Middle East is blessed. The question of accepting the other’s difference and identity remains the greatest challenge for the Arab nationalists.
http://www.masrifeki.com/english.4.074.0.htm

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fascism in the Arab world – pan Arabism

December 23, 2008

Fascism in the Arab world – Pan-Arabism, etc. (Part 1)

The Arab Predicament: Arab Political Thought and Practice Since 1967 – by Fouad Ajami – 1992 (page 135)
Fascism found an expression in the Young Egypt party, which was a parody of the fascist movement that swept Europe in the 1930s and 1940s; the Muslim Brotherhood thrived at a time of crisis and continues to survive at the present…
http://books.google.com/books?id=Qj-UEPal-cwC&pg=PA135&lpg=PA135

A History of Fascism, 1914-1945 – by Stanley G. Payne – 1996 – History (Page 352)
The Fascist regime had him proclaimed a “hero of Islam” and “defender of Islam” in Italian Libya, where a parallel Libyan Arab Fascist Party was created. If Mussolini supported Zionists to some extent as a lever against the British Empire, both he and Hitler subsidized Haj Amin el Husseini, the violently anti-Jewish grand mufti of Jerusalem. Anti-Jewish feeling mounted in parts of the Middle East during the 1930s, as the Fascist and Nazi regimes and doctrines made increasing sense to many Arab nationalists. King Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia sought German arms and contacts and was favorably received. Various delegations of Syrians and Iraqis attended the Niirnberg party congresses, and there were several different Arabic translations of Mein Kampf. Both the German and Italian regimes were active in propaganda in the Arab world, and there was much pro-German sentiment in Egypt. At least seven different Arab nationalist groups had developed shirt movements by 1939 (white, gray, and iron in Syria; blue and green in Egypt; … Syrian… Iraqi Futuwa… Young Egypt Movement … all three were territorially expansionist, with Sami Shawkat, the Futuwa ideologue, envisioning the “Arab nation” as eventually covering half the globe (though by vonversion…
http://books.google.com/books?id=NLiFIEdI1V4C&pg=PA352

A History of Fascism, 1914-1945 – by Stanley G. Payne – 1996 – History (Page 515)
As one approaches the Middle East, however, the trail becomes warmer. This is an area originally impacted to some extent by paradigmatic European fascism.
Some of the new nationalist regimes which developed in the Middle East during the second half of the century exhibited more of the characteristics of fascism than those of any other part of the world. A first example was the Egyptian regime under Nasser, with its Fuhrerprinzip, “Arab socialism,” a state sector of the economy approaching 40 percent, and bellicosity toward Israel…
At first glance a better case might be made for the Libyan dictatorship of Mu’ammar al-Gadhafi, established in 1969. Though the dictator of a major oil-exporting country, Gaddafi is a fanatical Muslim… “Brother Colonel” has renounced capitalism, preaching pan-Arabism and a form of “Arab socialism,” while his interest in militarism, violence, …
http://books.google.com/books?id=NLiFIEdI1V4C&pg=PA515

More on the devil of Pan-Arabism racism in books

October 31, 2008

The Middle East – Page 89
by Library Information and Research Service – Middle East – 1999
After Sayyid Jamal, in Arabic countries and especially in Egypt, many
individuals were found who, by leaning on racism, Arabism and pan-Arabism, …
http://books.google.com/books?id=Ma1tAAAAMAAJ&q=arabism

A New Road for France – Page 30
by Jacques Soustelle, Benjamin Protter – Political Science –
1965 – 278 pages
Israel and French Algeria were… two barriers against which the totalitarian wave.. embodied by Nasser… a dictatorial pseudo-state type was created in Algeria, firmly tied to a single party, dominated by
the racist ideology of a Nasser-type pan-Arabism and by the revolutionary fanaticism of the Ulemas…algeria engaged itself in this fundamental domain on the road traced by Nasser’s Pan-Arabism and that the Christian and Jewish minority has been victim of a new discrimination …the enlightened spokesmen of human fraternity and peace are
symbolized
by Gamal Abdel-Nasser, who assiduously prepares, with the Nazis around him, the revenge of Himmler and Eichmann against Israel.
http://books.google.com/books?id=vPcAAAAAMAAJ&q=arabism+nasser

Violence, Political Culture & Development in Africa – Page 98
by Preben Kaarsholm – Social Science – 2006 – 208 pages
… and the racist ideology of ‘Arabism’ aligned with Islam that a succession of governments in Khartoum had adopted in fighting the wars in the South. …
http://books.google.com/books?id=G-pVrSSxU7IC&pg=PA98

Rethinking Nationalism in the Arab Middle
East – Page 213
by James P. Jankowski, I. Gershoni – History – 1997 – 372
pages
… of the Algerian Front Islamique du Salut (FIS) uses the 1967
defeat as proof that Arabism, being a form of racism, cannot elicit a sense
of community …
http://books.google.com/books?id=f3axNF2GdCkC&pg=PA213

African Politics – Page 84
by P. F. Gonidec – Political Science – 1980 – 367 pages
In the beginning, under the umbrella of Islamism and
subsequently of Arabism,
… This is the ‘anti-racist racism’ of JP Sartre, who has
very well analysed …
http://books.google.com/books?id=4lMcN-EWwTcC&pg=PA84

Racism, Culture, Markets – Page 139
by John Gabriel – Social Science – 1994 – 212 pages
without parallel economic growth… inevitably delivers a
population into some kind of ism, whether it be communism,
fascism or pan Arabism, and weans them away from democracy
http://books.google.com/books?id=wKsxy6lioasC&pg=PA139

Ideology and International Relations in the Modern World – Page
238
by Alan Cassels – Political Science – 1996 – 302 pages
With the exception of Zionism (hardly a Third-World
phenomenon), all the ideologies just discussed – pan-Islam, pan-Arabism and
other anti-Western …stimulated by some degree of racial ‘anti-white’ sentiment
http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA238&dq=&id=DkN6M2mvh9EC&output=html