Posts Tagged ‘slavery today’

The Dark World of the Arab Child Slave Trade‎

June 29, 2011

The Dark World of the Arab Child Slave Trade‎
AINA (press release) – Stephen Brown – Jun 11, 2011

While tens of thousands of adults are also victims of Arab slavers, many people only first took notice of the Arab slave trade in children when reports of enslaved child camel jockeys emerged from Persian Gulf countries. A 2004 HBO documentary on the subject was especially responsible for making Americans aware of this modern-day barbarism. These boys, who were sold by poor parents hoping their offspring would some day experience a better life, were primarily from South Asia. But instead of a life of dignity and meaningful work, they wound up in the Middle East where they were made to race camels for their Arab masters. Beaten and often sexually abused, they were all kept undernourished, so that the camels would have less weight to carry.

“As many as 6,000 child camel jockeys…languished in hidden slavery on ozbah farms, where their masters beat them and starved them to keep their weight down,” wrote E. Benjamin Skinner in his book, A Crime So Monstrous.

[…]

When investigating in the 1990s the enslavement of hundreds of thousands of black Africans in Mauritania by Arab-Berber masters, African-American author Samuel Cotton was stunned to discover that African children were still being kidnapped by Arabs traveling with camels carrying big baskets. The child, usually playing alone, would suddenly be snatched from its play and placed in one such basket, after which its new owners hurried away. The children, he was told, are sometimes found later “hundreds of miles away as slaves.”

Also during his investigation, which was summarized in his highly informative book Silent Terror: A Journey Into Contemporary African Slavery, Cotton was told there was “still a huge trafficking in slaves going on between Mauritania and the United Arab Emirates.”

Black African children are also not always stolen so surreptitiously. Until recently in the southern Sudan, the old-fashioned slave raid witnessed villages being burned down, the men killed and the women and children captured. This was the Arab slavers’ main harvesting tool of humans. Thousands of children were captured by this murderous method and forcibly taken as agricultural, domestic and sex slaves to Arab northern Sudan — where many still languish today. Darfur has also seen many children disappear from both refugee camps and towns subjected to central government attack. They are suspected victims of Arab slave hunters.

But it is not only non-Arab children who are Arab child slave trade victims. An Egyptian newspaper, referring to a 2008 UNICEF report, stated Egyptian children are being bought and sold for about $3,000 for “domestic work and farming, among other things.” This trade in children is so extensive in Egypt, organizations are “employing brokers, and even operating their own web sites.

“Many are also sent to the Gulf States, with orphanages being a major supplier,” the story further reports….

http://www.aina.org/news/20110611201620.htm

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Recent on: Arab racism

June 12, 2011

The Guardian Dubai’s skyscrapers, stained by the blood of migrant workers
The Guardian – ‎May 27, 2011‎
It seems to me a place where the worst of western capitalism and the worst of Gulf Arab racism meet in a horrible vortex. The most pervasive feeling is of a lack of compassion, where the commoditisation of everything and the disdain for certain …
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/may/27/dubai-migrant-worker-deaths

Another Tack: No Jews in Judea 
Jerusalem Post – Sarah Honig – ‎Jun 10, 2011‎
The international community relishes reviling ultra-tolerant Israel while it ignores and even justifies crude Arab racism. Just try to imagine what would have happened had Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu stood before some Jewish forum and exclaimed that “from now on we won’t allow the presence of one Arab in our independent Israel with Jerusalem as its capital.”

…Addressing a recent emergency session of Arab League foreign ministers in Doha, Qatar, Mahmoud Abbas unabashedly declared that “when an independent Palestinian state with Jerusalem as its capital is established, we won’t allow the presence of one Israeli in it.”

Not to put too fine a point on it, this is the Arabic version of the German-minted Judenrein – “clean of Jews.” Yet no Arab diplomat was discomfited or shocked. Abbas consistently accentuates the same sentence with only trivial verbal variations. In December 2010, for instance, he put us on notice that “I will never allow a single Israeli to live among us on Palestinian land.”
http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Columnists/Article.aspx?id=224315

The Dark World of the Arab Child Slave Trade 
AINA (press release) – Stephen Brown – [June 12, 2011]
Arab racism is at the roots of Islamic slavery that has seen 14 million black Africans enslaved and sold around the Islamic world from the seventh to the twentieth century. Unfortunately for its victims, the abolition of Arab slavery will be difficult … 
http://www.aina.org/news/20110611201620.htm

World awaits for S. Sudan to separate from ‘Arab Islamic Racist Apartheid’ in the north

January 11, 2011

World eagerly awaits for S. Sudan to separate from ‘Arab Islamic Racist Apartheid’ in the north

Sudan’s Referendum: Will Africa’s Largest Country Split in Two?‎
The Women’s International Perspective – Reem Abbas – (Jan. 2011)
His vision was for a “New Sudan” – formulated along the lines of post-apartheid South Africa.

http://thewip.net/contributors/2011/01/sudans_referendum_will_africas.html

Battle for peace in Sudan: an analysis of the Abuja conferences, 1992-1993 – Page 33
Steven Wöndu, Ann Mosely Lesch – 2000 – 247 pages
‘Racial and religious apartheid … [is the central problem] in the Sudan’ [1:19 Nhial Deng] and ‘racial and religious … [3:43-44 Deng Alor] The North looked to the Arab-Islamic world whereas the South reacted by turning towards black …
http://books.google.com/books?id=SynjyYRvm4YC&pg=PA33

Burden of Nationality: memoirs of an African aidworker/journalist, 1970s-1990s – Page 65 – Jacob J. Akol – 2006 – 288 pages
The current population of the Sudan is estimated at close to 30 million, of which one third is in Southern Sudan, … there is no more apartheid in Africa, while in reality the Islamic Fundamentalism in Sudan is worse than apartheid. …
http://books.google.com/books?id=EhAarggJTjIC&pg=PA65

Sanction Sudan like apartheid South Africa, Tutu says | Reuters 5 Jun 2007 … BRUSSELS, June 5 (Reuters) – The international community should press Sudan to end the conflict in Darfur with the same kinds of sanctions …

http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKL05206033._CH_.242020070605

Uganda/Sudan: The slow, violent death of apartheid in Sudan …19 Sep 2006 … By the time you read this article, the fate of the long-suffering people of Darfur will most likely have been decided at an emergency …

http://www.afrika.no/Detailed/12818.html

[PDF] South Sudan, an introduction
By Chinweizu
A presentation to the Nigeria-South Sudan Friendship Association (NISSFA), in Lagos, 26 MAR 2008

Sudan is the microcosm of Black Africa’s unacknowledged Arab problem, a problem of racism, colonialism, enslavement and an Arab agenda of cultural, political and territorial expansion at the expense of Black Africa. It would take a fat book to adequately explain these matters; however, the brief answers to the 11 questions below attempt to throw preliminary light on the situation of the Afro-Sudanese.

Q1: What is the basic problem in Sudan?
In Sudan, Black Africans (The Afro-Sudanese in South Sudan, Darfur, Nubia, etc) are fighting against an Arab settler minority regime, ruling from Khartoum. They are fighting against a racist, Arab supremacist rule that is worse, much worse, than Apartheid. The Sudan situation has many of the features of Apartheid and, to make things worse, the raiding of black African villages by Arabs who sell black captives into slavery in Northern Sudan and other parts of the Arab world, is still going on there today in the 21st century. Slave raiding was not even part of the loathsome evils of Apartheid.
The South Sudanese, after a 50years war of liberation (1955-2005)—the longest war in Africa– finally got Khartoum to sign the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, CPA, in 2005. The CPA has the backing of the International Community. It grants the South Sudanese limited autonomy through the Government of South Sudan, and provides for a Self-Determination referendum in 2011. The referendum will give the people of South Sudan the chance to decide whether South Sudan will remain within Sudan or secede and become independent.
In a replay of how Khartoum unilaterally abrogated the 1972 Addis Ababa peace accord that ended the Anya-Anya phase of the Afro-Arab race war in Sudan, [an accord that, like the CPA, also granted regional autonomy to South Sudan], Khartoum is determined to kill the CPA, and is maneuvering to resume war on South Sudan and prevent the referendum.
http://www.houseofknowledge.org.uk/new/doc/6_South_Sudan_and_the_problem_of_Arab_racism_in_Black_Africa.pdf

[PDF] Is Sudan not an Apartheid State?

QUESTION TIME PATRICK VAN RENSBURG

Non-interference was used by South Africa’s Apartheid regime to counter UN … Have the military rulers not sought to make Sudan an. Arab and Islamic state? …
http://www.rightlivelihood.org/fileadmin/Files/PDF/Literature_Recipients/van_Rensburg/van_Rensburg_-_Sudan.pdf

The Apartheid Propaganda 28 Aug 2004 … Beyond exposing the absurdity of the charges against Israel, it is time to put Arab and Islamic racism – as shown in Sudan and elsewhere …
http://www.aish.com/jw/me/48909392.html

Video: A ‘lost boy’ of Sudan returns to rebuild his homeland

January 7, 2011

On Sunday, the people of Southern Sudan will begin voting on whether to remain part of a unified Sudan or become an independent state. Sudan, Africa’s largest nation, is an oil-rich country run by Islamist Arabs. What happens there matters to all of us for strategic and humanitarian reasons. Here’s what you need to know:

For generations, southern Sudan has been dominated by the Islamist-run government in Khartoum, which has sought to impose Sharia law on the south’s Christians and animists.

Religion is one of the main causes of two bloody civil wars that have killed two million southern Sudanese. Another point of contention: control of Sudan’s oil reserves that lie mostly in the south and along the border with the north. If, as expected, the south votes to secede, many fear another wave of violence, despite assurances from Sudan’s president, Omar al Bashir, that he will accept the results of the election: “If the south secedes, we will welcome it.”

But can Bashir be trusted? He has been indicted as a war criminal for his brutal military campaign against rebels and civilians in Darfur. That fighting, which began in 2003, has left 300,000 dead. Need to Know sent producer George Lerner to southern Sudan to report on one former refugee’s efforts to help rebuild his homeland in anticipation of a vote for independence.

The Winston Foundation, The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS.
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/video/video-a-lost-boy-of-sudan-returns-to-rebuild-his-homeland/6249/

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