Posts Tagged ‘Africans’

Racism in the Islamic Republic of Iran

April 11, 2011

Racism in the Islamic Republic of Iran

Victims include:
Azeris
Beluchis
Jews
Kurds
Blacks
Bahai
Arabs

UN anti-racism panel finds Iran discriminating against Kurds, Arabs, other ethnic minorities 28.8.2010

GENEVA, — A United Nations panel says Arabs, Kurds and other minorities in Iran face discrimination because of their ethnicity.

The U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination says minorities in the Islamic republic don’t enjoy the same rights to free expression, health and housing as other ethnic groups.

The panel published a report Friday urging Iran to end all forms of discrimination and provide clearer information for future reports.

The Geneva-based panel also rejected Iran’s claims that discrimination against women and religious minorities such as the Baha’i isn’t covered by the U.N.’s 1969 anti-racism convention. �
UN anti-racism panel finds Iran discriminating against Kurds, Arabs, other ethnic minorities.
— UN racism body decries Iran’s treatment of ethnic minorities

Iran should do more to protect its ethnic minorities such as Arabs, Kurds and Baluch, a United Nations human rights body said on Friday.

The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), a group of 18 independent rights experts, said Iran lacked data on the numbers of ethnic minorities despite a census in 2007, but the participation of such people in public life appeared to be lower than could be expected.

Several armed groups opposed to the government are active in Iran, mostly made up of ethnic Kurds in the northwest, Baluch in the southeast and Arabs in the southwest.

“The Committee expresses concern at the limited enjoyment of political, economic, social and cultural rights by… Arab, Azeri, Balochi, Kurdish communities and some communities of non-citizens,” it said in a report on a regular review of Iran’s compliance with a 1969 international treaty banning racism.

It also urged Iran to continue its efforts to empower women and promote their rights, paying particular attention to women belonging to ethnic minorities.

Some tenets of Islamic sharia law disadvantage Iranian women, Indian committee member Dilip Lahiri said. “On the other hand, in terms of their education and access to jobs, very remarkable progress has been made in Iran,” he told a briefing.

The committee voiced concern at reports of a selection procedure for state officials and employees, known as gozinesh, requiring them to demonstrate allegiance to the Islamic Republic of Iran and the state religion, which could limit opportunities for ethnic and religious minorities.

It said that lack of complaints was not proof of the absence of racial discrimination, as victims may not have confidence in the police or judicial authorities to handle them.

It called on Iran to set up an independent national human rights institution and report back to it at the start of 2013 on how it was dealing with the concerns and recommendations.

Copyright, respective author or news agency, The Associated Press AP�
http://www.ekurd.net/mismas/articles/misc2010/8/irankurd648.htm

Iran and the challenge of diversity: Islamic fundamentalism, Aryanist racism, and democratic struggles
Alireza Asgharzadeh, Palgrave Connect (Online service)
Palgrave Macmillan, 2007 – 249 pages
This book interrogates the racist construction of Arya/Aria and Aryanism in an Iranian context, arguing that a racialized interpretation of these concepts has given the Indo-European speaking Persian ethnic group an advantage over Iran?s non-Persian nationalities and communities. Based on multidisciplinary research drawing on history, sociology, literature, politics, anthropology and cultural studies, Alireza Asgharzadeh critiques the privileged place of Farsi and the Persian ethnic group in contemporary Iran. The book highlights difference and diversity as major socio-political issues that will determine the future course of social, cultural, and political developments in Iran. Pointing to the increasing inadequacy of Islamic fundamentalism in functioning as a grand narrative, Asgharzadeh explores the racist approach of the current Islamic government to issues of difference and diversity in the country, and shows how these issues are challenging the very existence of the Islamic regime in Iran.
http://books.google.com/books?id=RlY-SQAACAAJ

Iran: A People Interrupted
Hamid Dabashi – New Press, 2008 – 324 pages – Page 151
And the bogus pro- Palestinian politics of the reigning regime degenerates into an anti-Jewish language. Iranian racism is particularly evident in Tehran, where similar racist negativity is directed at provincial Iranians— the Isfahanis, the Rashtis, the Azaris, the Kurds, the Lors, the Baluchis, the Arabs, or what the Tehranis in moments of unsurpassed whitewashed racism call dehatis, a nasty derogatory term meaning “the peasants.” The roots of this Tehrani-based racism is deeply buried in the whitewashed, Eurocentric Iranian bourgeoisie, who grotesquely identify with Europe, dye their hair blond, provincial Iranians.
http://books.google.com/books?&id=2pHtAAAAMAAJ&dq=lors
http://books.google.com/books?&id=2pHtAAAAMAAJ&dq=denigrate

Page 139
The sharp contrast in my parents’ skin colors alerted me to an astounding prevalence of Iranian racism very early in my life.2 My father’s nickname was ” Dadi Siah,” or “Dadi the Black” — his name being Khodadad, Dadi for short.
http://books.google.com/books?&id=2pHtAAAAMAAJ&dq=dadi

A Review of the imposed war by the Iraqi regime upon the Islamic Republic of Iran. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Legal Department – 1983 – 194 pages – Page xvii
Airing several radio broadcasts in the Persian, Turkish, Armenian, Kurdish, Turkman and Baluchi languages in order … During celebrations marking the twelfth anniversary of coming to power of the Ba ‘athist Party in lraq, placards bearing slogans such as “leave the Arabs of Ahwaz alone”, “the Arab Gulf is the graveyard of the racist Persian regime” were…
http://books.google.com/books?id=JiPRAAAAMAAJ&q=baluchi
http://books.google.com/books?id=JiPRAAAAMAAJ&q=racist

Near East/South Asia report: Issue 84156
United States. Foreign Broadcast Information Service, United States. Joint Publications Research Service – Page 34
Political organizations in Ahvaz were hoping for another regime to succeed the Shah’s anti-Arab, racist regime which was … At first, the national movement in Ahvaz supported the present regime in Iran and gave it its blessings.�
http://books.google.com/books?&id=eTG6AAAAIAAJ&dq=racist

Human rights, the UN and the Bahá’ís in Iran – Page 401
Nazila Ghanea-Hercock – 2002 – 628 pages – Preview
He said that the Committee had tried to establish whether Iran’s internal laws were in conformity with the Convention but that ‘the latest report offered no solution to that question’. The only information forthcoming from the … submitted together in document CERD/C/226/Add.8 dated 11 February 1993.41 This was again a very dry legislative document, referring to various constitutional and other legal provisions against racism in Iran with absolutely no light�
http://books.google.com/books?id=GeHNoviEXw0C&pg=PA401

Al-Ahwaz.com – aboutUsThus, draw attention to Ahwaz Internet network and the Ahwazi Arab info Center are Media … Iran has been applying a policy of racial discrimination in the …
http://www.al-ahwaz.com/english/2011/index.php?page=aboutUs

Peter Tatchell: Iran is a Racist State27 Oct 2006 … Iran is waging a secret, racist war against its Arab population. …. Ahwaz produces 90% of Iran ’s oil and 10% of OPEC’s global output. …
http://www.petertatchell.net/international/iranraciststate.htm

Iran after the revolution: crisis of an Islamic state – Page 231
Saeed Rahnema, Sohrab Behdad – 1996 – 256 pages
Turkish and Arab domination over Iran in the remote past was declared the main historical obstacle to the continuity of the glorious Persian empire. This racist ideology denied the national, linguistic and cultural diversity of Iran.
http://books.google.com/books?id=VlyCpbY9_QQC&pg=PA231

Azerbaijan Since Independence – Page 460
Svante E. Cornell – M.E. Sharpe, 2010 – 512 pages
After the summer 2003 demonstrations, the Iranian government cracked down on student as well as nationalist organizations. A 19-year-old Azeri girl was executed by Iranian authorities in July 2003 for her role in the protests (―Ethnic Azeri Student Leader Killed in Iran—Paper, BBC Monitoring International Reports, July 22, 2002). In an earlier incident, in January 2000, Iranian forces had opened fire on a demonstration in Tabriz (―Azeri TV Says Iranian Police Opened Fire During Rally in Tabriz, BBC Summary of World Broadcasts, January 10, 2000).
http://books.google.com/books?id=whVDskeHl2YC&pg=PA460

Racist insults against Azerbaijani Turks in Iran Iranian.com 10 May 2010 … If anyone has been to this juvenile site you’ll know that it …
http://www.iranian.com/main/blog/tapesh/racist-insults-against-azerbaijani-turks-iran

Iran’s anti-Arab racism Comment is free guardian.co.uk 26 Oct 2007 … Peter Tatchell: Iran treats its Arab minority as second-class citizens. Now it is planning to hang six of them after rigged trials held in …
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2007/oct/26/iransantiarabracism

Netherlands Institute of Human Rights – CERD Concluding Observations: IRAN ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF – 20 Feb 2011 … The Committee recommends that the State party undertake the necessary measures to harmonize its domestic legislation with the Convention. It also recommends that the State party take further steps for public dissemination of the provisions of the Convention and the possibilities for its invocation to combat racial discrimination, including in minority languages, and that it provide its Government officials with education and training in this area.

8. The Committee notes the information furnished by the State party on the definition of racial discrimination in article 19 of the Iranian Constitution and reiterates its concern that this definition does not explicitly cover the forms of racial and ethnic discrimination prohibited under the Convention. (art. 1)

The Committee again urges the State party to consider reviewing the definition of racial discrimination contained in its Constitution and domestic law in order to bring it into full conformity with article 1, paragraph 1, of the Convention.

9. While commending the efforts undertaken by the State party to empower women, the Committee is concerned that women of minority origin may be at risk of facing double discrimination. (art. 2)
The Committee draws the State party’s attention to its general recommendation No. 25 (2000) on gender-related dimensions of racial discrimination and recommends that the State party continue its efforts to empower women and promote their rights, paying particular attention to women belonging to minorities.

10. The Committee notes the information furnished by the State party on the 1985 Press Act. The Committee also notes the efforts undertaken by the State party to combat racist discourse in the media by applying sanctions to newspapers whose publications have included racist discourse. However, the Committee is concerned at continued reports of racial discrimination, inter alia, directed against Azeri communities in the media, including stereotyped and demeaning portrayals of those peoples and communities. The Committee is also concerned at the reports of racial discrimination in everyday life and statements of racial discrimination and incitement to hatred by government officials. (art. 4)

The Committee recommends that the State party take appropriate steps to combat manifestations in the media, as well as in everyday life, of racial prejudice that could lead to racial discrimination. The Committee also recommends that, in the area of information, the State party promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among the various racial and ethnic groups in the State party, especially on the part of public officials, and including through the adoption of a media code of ethics that would commit the media to showing respect for the identity and culture of all communities in the State party, taking into account the possible intersection of racial and religious discrimination. It reiterates its previous request that the State party submit information in its next periodic report on the application of this law to combat racial discrimination…
http://sim.law.uu.nl/SIM/CaseLaw/uncom.nsf/804bb175b68baaf7c125667f004cb333/4af24cf864d4b316c125778f0032b7a2?OpenDocument

Today.Az – All news from Azerbaijan – 16 Nov 2006 … [...]
Balochis have been preyed upon by the Iranian regime. On 23 August 2006, the Marsad Group attacked a village near Zahidan, the provincial capital of Balochistan, and killed two young men in front of women and children. They were forced out of their homes, to search for the members of resistance movement and weapons. The two young men had protested against the ill treatment of the women. On the 24th of August Amir Hamzeh Eidouzehi, a young man, was hanged in public in Baloch town of Khash, and another young men, Ali Jan Moradi, was hanged in IranShahr on 27 August 2006, both were accused of instigating public trouble and drug trafficking, a sentenced without trail. On the 24th of September three men identified as Ali Karimi, Gholam Koohkan, and Khodamorad Lashkarzadeh, were hanged in prison in provincial capital Zahedan. These dissidents were also executed on charges of drug smuggling and convicted without trial.

Azeri Turks, comprising around a third of the Iranian population and also subject to racism in Iran, have also backed the campaign to halt the execution of Ahwazis. The Azerbaijani Youth Association is lobbying the European Parliament and European governments to take action. A representative wrote to the British Ahwazi Friendship Society (BAFS), saying: “It is with great concern that I have heard about Ahwazis in Iran facing execution. When it comes to life we make no difference on if they are Arabs or Turks. We must show solidarity with each other and together fight against these fascists.”
http://www.today.az/print/news/politics/32679.html

Iran: Azeri Turks protest against discrimination Workers’ Liberty – I will fight for the independendence of my Azeri brothers in Iran and their succession from the persion chavinism and racism.
http://www.workersliberty.org/node/6325

Lates on hypocritical Arab racism vis-a-vis crimes against humanity in the Sudan

March 21, 2011

Sudan: Hypocrisy of NCP And Double Standards of the Arab Media‎

AllAfrica.com – Mahmoud A. Suleiman – Mar 4, 2011

The League’s member state allowed al-Bashir to travel around their countries without being apprehended! Hypocrisy and racist double standards are the force …

It seems that the opportunist authoritarian racist National Congress Party (NCP) regime in Khartoum found joy and delight in the events in Libya favourable to grab political revenge against its archenemy the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) through statements issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs that it does not exclude the participation of the Darfur rebels in the suppression of the popular mass demonstrations that taking place in all parts of Libya. The purpose behind this evil assertion was to incite sedition to create a rift between the people of Libya and the Just cause of the people of Sudan in Darfur.

http://allafrica.com/stories/201103040870.html

S. Sudan says it will suspend talks with north‎

The Herald | HeraldOnline.com – Maggie Fick – Mar 13, 2011

The northern government has “been arming Arab tribes … so that they carry out genocide …

http://www.heraldonline.com/2011/03/13/2905600/s-sudan-says-it-will-suspend-talks.html

18 March 2011 Last updated at 13:30 ET

South Sudan: SPLA and Athor clashes ‘kill scores’

Hundreds have been killed and injured in clashes with George Athor’s men this year Continue reading the main story

Two days of fighting between the South Sudan army and rebels have killed about 70 people, officials say.

The clashes between the SPLA and fighters loyal to rebel leader George Athor have broken out in three states.

After similar clashes last week, the southern government accused the north and President Omar al-Bashir of trying to destabilise it.

South Sudan is due to declare independence in July, following decades of north-south conflict.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12791475

Lesson in hypocrisy // Racism of the Arab Muslim World [the most racist world]

December 10, 2010

Lesson in hypocrisy // Racism of the Arab Muslim World

Toronto Sun ^ | December 4, 2010 | Michael Coren

Lesson in hypocrisy Massive overreaction by Americans and their allies over WikiLeaks details

By MICHAEL COREN. QMI Agency

Last Updated: December 4, 2010 2:00am

The WikiLeaks revelations we have been waiting for turned out to be little more than the obvious, the banal, the mildly interesting and the confirmation of what we assumed to be the case in the first place.

We were told intelligence agencies gather information on other countries, that the Americans think Canadians lack self-esteem and are anti-American, that the Europeans can be smug, and Prince Andrew can be slightly rude.

Well I never. What is more interesting about the whole episode is the massive overreaction of the Americans and their allies, and also why a neurotic, sexually confused loner and self-confessed nerd was allowed access to classified information in the U.S. military, when everything about him screamed “untrustworthy, and potential spy.”

Also, why the New York Times, among others, refused to print the climategate leaks as they were “gathered illegally,” but so relished printing the WikiLeaks information.

The answer, of course, is as apparent as a liberal’s hypocrisy. The climategate e-mails showed some of the zealots behind the global warming industry to be dishonest and malicious, and so discredited the left.

The WikiLeaks material embarrasses the military, Washington, and those considered more hawkish.

The crass double standards of the New York Times and their comrades aside, one aspect of the story that deserves more attention is the desire of the King of Saudi Arabia for the West to bomb Iran.

Again, this should come as no surprise to anybody who understands the Middle East but it does confirm the genuine, rather than the Lawrence of Arabia/George Galloway fantasies, about the region.

There is no such thing as Arab brotherhood and Muslim brotherhood, and no concern for the Palestinians beyond how they can be used as a stick to bash the Jews and the West. The most long-lasting and sadistic empire within the Islamic world was the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Ottomans were and are Muslim.

Most of the victims of Muslim terror are other Muslims, and there is no racism like the racism of an Arab Muslim towards a Pakistani Muslim, a Persian Muslim towards an Arab Muslim, and a Turk towards an Arab or a Pakistani. As for Middle Eastern Muslim views on black Muslims, don’t even ask.

We in the non-Islamic world beat ourselves up for being insensitive, when we are models of equality and racial and religious tolerance. The Saudis want nothing more than their Sunni country to be protected against Shiite Iranians, and in this they are joined by the Egyptians, the Jordanians and the Gulf states. The Syrians also detest the Iranians, but they are too geographically close to them to admit this and so play a very careful game.

Informed sources claim the Saudis have already told Israel their air defence systems will be turned off at certain times, and this isn’t so they can do repair work! The Palestinians? Everyone treats them badly, but only Israel is blamed.

WikiLeaks doesn’t really change very much at all, but perhaps it does give us a glimpse into the world behind the screams and banners of the usual protesters and moaners.

http://www.torontosun.com/comment/columnists/michael_coren/2010/12/03/16419351.html

Arab writer admits: “We [Arabs] are racist to the bones”

April 11, 2010

Wednesday, 24 March 2010

“White Skin, Black Mask”: An Interview with Kamel Riahi

Kamel Riahi was born in the village of Al Manafikh, Tunisia, in 1974. Riahi, who is the head of the Arab Higher Institute for Translation, has recently moved back to his native Tunisia, and works as a full-time author. After having received his Masters in Arabic literature, he is currently preparing for his PhD in modern Arabic literature. He has published a number of short stories and novels, most notably The Scalpel, which won him the 2007 Comar D’Or for Arabic literature. Last November, Riahi joined four other Beirut39 participants at the inaugural ‘Nadwa’ (writers’ workshop) held by the International Prize for Arab Fiction. His texts have been translated into English, French, Italian and Hebrew. Riahi talks to Beirut39 about the racial representation of the characters in his novels, and his previous life as a nomad.

Translated from Arabic (below). Interviewed by Sousan Hammad.

Tell us more about you. When did you first start writing?

I hail from the northwest region of Tunisia, a marginalized region that suffers poverty and oblivion. Since childhood I moved between numerous jobs: I was a farmer, a pig and lizard hunter, a trafficker of cloths from Morocco, an electrician, and a bookseller in the backstreets of the capital city. I was also a traveling photographer who moved from north to south in order to capture pictures of jungle women. Later in my years I became an editor at a number of Tunisian and Arabic newspapers, and a teacher’s assistant at the University, a debater, and finally an international employee at various Arabic universities.

This journey has taught me that a human is like an idol, of whom Hemingway once said “a man can be destroyed but not defeated”. My life is full of ups and downs, an experimental life that never runs out of adventures. I answer to its appeal like a man haunted with a Jinn, playing hide-and-seek, I defeat it and it defeats me. I feel like I have a magical power that moves me to try and uncover it. I am not aware of what sort of power I may have, but it feels as if a creature larger than myself lives inside of me, struggling to break out to the world.

I started writing before I was conceived, I was in my mother’s womb, busily recording her plot to shed my blood and abort me. I struggled with all the medications and drugs she took to abort the baby, I counted her breaths.

I only started publishing in my twenties, after having lost my father.

And who are some of your most influential writers?

I am an avid reader to the point where I no longer remember who I read. I cultivate books and experiences, yet I never get influenced by anyone. I have always been myself: a complex identity yearning for independence. I love being a Bastard. I lived an orphan, and I loved being an orphan because this helped me become who I am. I have no idol, no father, no symbol and nothing is sacred.

There is a character in your novel, The Scalpel, who the narrator simply refers to as “the negro” (in Arabic as النيقرو .) At one point the narrator describes “the negro” as ‘simple and miserable’, one who reminds him of Mersault from The Stranger. Albert Camus characterized Mersault as being apathetic and alienated. These types of ‘racial’ social characterizations are similar to Ibn Khaldun’s writings. Would you say this is a deliberately placed connection?

Since I started writing fiction, I focused on the marginalized groups in Tunisia, whether socially or racially. My stories reflected the lives of the poor, the homeless, the shoe polishers, felines, young criminals, prostitutes, crushed employees, sailors and street peddlers.

I cared for the blacks in Tunisia so I tried to overcome the ideological arguments regarding them towards a psychological approach, and to show their daily suffering. The Negro in The Scalpel is a secondary character, yet he pleased my readers and nearly became the protagonist. A black man who hailed from the Tunisian countryside to became a guard at the “Jillaz” cemetery, the largest in Tunis. He is rebuked for being black. He lives a miserable life with his friend Bu-Lihya (the bearded one), both of them live in the same situation and pursue the same mystery: the case of the women’s assassinator. Both characters disappear on the same day in mysterious circumstances as if both are the two faces for the same token: one black, the other white, both of which are lost in the wilderness of the city.

You cannot judge a character by the name. This is what the novel tried to portray, since the entire novel is based on nicknames, not actual names. My novels mention no names. There’s the Negro, the bearded one, the mustached man, the Rotunda lady, the solid lady…etc. In the Arab World, a nickname ends the name.

The Negro chose to be called by this name because it reflected his color, his name did not suite him well, Saïd (The happy one), he felt alienated by that name.

My forthcoming novel will be titled The Gorilla, already one chapter has been translated into English by Peter Clark, a British translator. The protagonist will be a black man as well, and the story will uncover the (sexual) bastardness, racism and discrimination against blacks in the Arab world. Another novel I worked on, Diaries of a Slain Person, touches upon blacks in a new narrative game. These are themes that we must take into consideration, as I noticed in my many trips across the Arab world, with my careful observation, that Arabs are perfectly racist. A month ago, I was joined by a black Arab poet in Algeria, and was stunned by how she was received. All of this has confirmed to me that I am heading into the right track with this theme. Even in Tunisia, the most civilized Arab country, we still refer to whites as “free” and black as “slaves”. Blacks still suffer from being marginalized despite the fact that the law of the land and the constitution call for equality.

The name in the novel is a “wounded” name. Yet, names remain as signs that try to lead us, yet might be misleading in attempting to learn about ourselves. Saramago once said “Inside us there is something that has no name; that something is what we are.”

It might come as a surprise to you to learn that Negro was the term people called my black grandfather. I consider myself as someone of a Negro decent, although I am not black. Perhaps my wide nose proves this theory. Therefore, I am sympathetic towards the blacks ideologically, by heritage and by history. We, the whites, will not be liberated until we liberate ourselves from the racist views we have of other races and religions.

We still curse each other using “you’re Jewish” or “you’re Kurdish”, this is also racial and religious discrimination. Watch any Egyptian sitcom and tell me about the image of the Sudanese character. Listen to the Tunisian jokes about the Libyans or jokes about people from Hums in Greater Syria. Listen to the debates regarding noble families and family lineage… even horses now are divided between what is considered “noble” and what is not. We are racists to the bones. Attempting to hide or silence this fact will not help with the matter because we are a sick society which still suffers from the complexes of color and race.

http://beirut39.blogspot.com/2010/03/white-skin-black-mask-interview-with.html

More here:

http://arablit.wordpress.com/2010/03/28/kamel-riahi-on-arab-racism-writing-and-his-new-book/

Arabism’s racism against Kurds in “modern, moderate” Iraq

March 17, 2010

Arabism’s racism against Kurds in “modern, moderate” Iraq

wpr ^ 03-10

Allawi’s uphill climb got even steeper when Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi, a key leader in Allawi’s bloc, went on al-Jazeera after the election to say that Iraq’s president must be an Arab. Kurds reacted with outrage, while Maliki aides fanned out in the media to praise Talabani and deplore the racism behind Arab opposition to a Kurdish president. This aggravated Allawi’s liabilities: Though not anti-Kurd himself, much of his bloc is. Al-Itthad, a newspaper published by Talabani’s party, did not fail to notice, quoting Maliki representative Safiya Suhayl on March 10 praising Talabani. Allawi and Hashemi travelled to the Kurdish capital of Irbil over the weekend to try to make amends.
(Excerpt) Read more at http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/article.aspx?id=5279

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pseudo-state Algeria: A Monstrous, Pan-Arab Tyranny – Exposed by HRW (World Report 2010)

February 15, 2010

Pseudo-state Algeria: A Monstrous, Pan-Arab Tyranny, Exposed by HRW (World Report 2010)

Dr. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

February 09, 2010

[...]
Impunity for Past Abuses

Over 100,000 Algerians died during the political strife of the 1990s. Thousands more were “disappeared” by security forces or abducted by armed groups fighting the government, and have never been located, dead or alive. Perpetrators of atrocities during this era continue to enjoy impunity. The legal framework for that impunity is the 2006 Law on Peace and National Reconciliation, which provides an amnesty to security force members for the actions they took in the name of combating terrorism, and to armed group members not implicated in the most heinous acts.

[...]
Kabylia is the area whereby the Anti-Berber policies of the colonial French and their local puppets failed most; the Berbers are not a minority either in Algeria or in the other countries of the Atlas.

The Berbers constitute the totality of the local population; some of the Berbers forgot their native tongue, due to the racist, Pan-Arab, colonial policies of the French and the Algerian tyrannies.

In fact, Arabic speaking or Amazigh speaking people in Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Libya and Mauritania are all Berber.

Map of Kabylia. From:

http://www.moroccoboard.com/images/stories/kabyle.gif

http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/140861

Racism in Arab Lebanon? Commenters Respond to Ethiopian Airline 409 …

January 31, 2010

Racism in Lebanon? Commenters Respond to Ethiopian Airline 409

http://thefastertimes.com/lebanonandsyria/2010/01/30/racism-in-lebanon-commenters-respond-to-ethiopian-airline-409-tragedy/

Non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world [Racist Arabism and bigoted Islamism]

May 8, 2009

Non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world [Racist Arabism and bigoted Islamism]
eretzyisroel ^

Non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world

One key element missing from the discussion is the question of non-Arab and/or non-Muslims in the “Arab” world. The Arab nationalists have succeeded in establishing some 23 non-democratic, ethnically (Arab) and religiously (Islam) defined nation-states in over 1 million square miles of territory, often at the expense of non-Arabs, such as the Kurds (Muslims, non-Arabs), Assyrians (Christians, non-Arabs), Copts (Christians, non-Arabs), southern Sudanese (Christian and pagan non-Arabs), Maronite Lebanese (Christian and mostly identified with their Phoenician ancestors) and Mizrahi Jews. Arab nationalist ideology claims all this territory exclusively as “Arab” despite the legitimate claims of non-Arabs and/or non-Muslims to ancient homelands long ago arabized with the spread of Islam, often through conquest.

I believe that the Arab opposition to the existence of non-Arab, non-Muslim Israel is based on the ideological motivations which led to the persecution of non-Arab minorities. The Assyrians suffered massacre and expulsion by the Arab nationalists of Iraq in the 1920s and 1930s. The Kurds have been persecuted and have suffered terribly for their struggle to establish an independent Kurdistan (at the hands of the Turks and Iranians as well, but that is another story.)

Arab nationalist ideology, and its Islamicist couterpart, cannot and will not tolerate non-Arab and non-Islamic peoples organizing themselves into their own independent nation states. Indeed, I have seen on Islamicist web sites the goal of “regaining” Spain in the name of Islam.

I believe that we need to place Israel’s struggle to survive into this context. Any non-Arab/non-Islamic state in the region must rely on strength (political, moral, spiritual and military) if it wants to survive in the Middle East. In this context can we thus place Israel’s demand for security. It is not security for the sake of security, not seucirty for the sake of oppressing another people, but security for the sake of survival against two racist and exclusivist ideologies (Arabism and Islamicism) which have succeeded in repressing the just struggles for national self-determination of most non-Arab peoples in the Middle East.

To this end, I highly recommend looking at the following web sites:

Assyrian Democratic MovementAssyrian International News Agency

Copts.Com

The World Lebanese Organization

Maronite Research Council

Kudistan web

http://www.eretzyisroel.org/~jkatz/nonarab.html

Arabization of Africa, and Its Killing Fields – Arabization of Africa, and Its Killing Fields – “We Will Islamize America and Arabize Africa” – Dr Hassan Abdallah Turabi from Darfur, Sudan

March 29, 2009

Arabization of Africa, and Its Killing Fields – Arabization of Africa, and Its Killing Fields – “We Will Islamize America and Arabize Africa” – Dr Hassan Abdallah Turabi from Darfur, Sudan

Arabization of Africa, and Its Killing Fields – by Bankie F. Bankie

March 27, 2009

We Will Islamize America and Arabize Africa – Dr Hassan Abdallah Turabi from Darfur, Sudan

The whittling away of the remains of settler colonialism is proceeding with the increased development of Southern Africa. There is no parallel process of decolonisation in the Afro-Arab Borderlands, rather an internationally co-ordinated aggressive action is underway, to coral the Sudan liberation movements in places such as Darfur and in eastern Sudan, into a peace ‘laager’, with the generous dispensation of petro-dollars.

Given that the area of ‘ambiguous relations’(i.e. the Afro-Arab Borderlands) has been pushed southwards into the Sudan as a result of hundreds of years of interaction, it would be illogical to expect such a process of encroachment to stop from one moment to the other.

The push southwards by the same forces in the West African region, explains the tensions in the Ivory Coast, and the generalised fighting which took place in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Charles Taylor and Foday Sankor were trained in warfare and met in Libya.

It was Turabi, who exercised power in the first half of current Sudan President Bashir’s rule, who pursued a deliberate policy of implanting Islam in north America, whilst Arabization was spearheaded in Africa.

It was Turabi who sent some two thousand post-graduate northern Sudanese students to the US with instructions to form friendships with African Americans. Many of these graduates are now in the public service of Sudan.

As it happens, the Nation of Islam, led by Louis Farrakan in the USA, grouping Black Muslims in north America, has pursued a policy of support for the Khartoum regime, having taken material assistance from Khartoum.

Farrakan has gone so far as to say there is no slavery in Sudan, opposing the Writ issue against Bashir. This has affected African-American understanding and concerns about matters in Sudan. So that those demonstrating in the US against genocide in Darfur have been noticeably white.

In Africa, Arabization proceeds apace and now endangers African overall security. This we see in Somalia, where Sharia Law is being introduced.

Whereas Somalia has long been Islamic, it always was a united entity, before the collapse brought on by its last military ruler Siad Barre. It had one language and an African culture. This is now being changed. It will not stop in Somalia. Arabization will be pushed further south deep into Black Africa.

Arabia has used the so called ‘peace pact’ to its advantage, as a strategy to relentlessly push its influence southwards. It was used effectively by the Lord Resistance Army (LRA).

Like with the UNITA movement of Jonas Savimbi in Angola, the tactical use of the temporary cessation of hostilities, to lull the opposition into a non-combative posture, creating a breathing space, whilst restocking and preparing for the next offensive, is as old as time itself. Such ceasefires do not last.

The attempts by certain quarters to withhold the Writ to be issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) against Joseph Kony of the LRA, defeated the ends of justice and permitted him to relocate from south Sudan to the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, to the bloody costs of the Congolese and the people of the Central African Republic.

This relocation needs further investigation. There was a time before 2005 and the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), between the Khartoum government and south Sudan, when Kony lived in Juba, which was then a garrison town controlled by Khartoum, under the protection of the Bashir government in Khartoum. Who is to say that Kony is still not financed by Khartoum?

The relentless push southwards by Arabia has never abated – indeed some westerners would say that the major new pre-occupation in international relations at the turn of the century was the global Jihad, which emerged as a counterpoint to the existence of Israel, spreading outside of the Middle East and African theatres, to terrorise the world.

In Africa, current developments in Somalia are cause for sober reflection. Whereas the Somalis in their majority are Muslims, Somalia was known, before the current difficulties, as an integrated society, with one culture and one language, Somali.

What is unfolding, under the noses of the African Union (AU) Peacekeepers, is the annexation of Somalia into the Arab League, Arabia and the Arabian zone of influence – that is the Arabization of Somalia.

Such annexation is precisely what the south of Sudan fought against for some 39 years.

The question is, will Africa south of the Sahara, on this occasion, yet again, be compliant, watching this process without registering protest?

The current Libyan ‘King of Kings’ of the AU, can hardly be expected to intervene in such an issue, going on his past record of intervention in places such as Tchad and Sudan. The supreme dilemma of Chairman Ping of the AU must be, what to tell the peacekeepers in Somalia, is their mission.

Apart from maintaining the peace, why are the belligerents fighting, why are they (peacekeepers) being attacked? What is the root cause of the conflict in the country? History teaches us that soldiers, at the cost of their lives, always return home to inform what were the stakes in the fighting. Usually this has a radicalising impact on the home population.

The era of denial about the truths of the Borderlands is over. If the lessons were not learnt through the history, the contemporary period is littered with case studies in southern Sudan and Darfur, not to mention northern Tchad (Tibesti), northern Niger, northern Mali, Mauritania and now Somalia. The lid can no longer be kept on. The truth is out.

The inquiries of the ICC into mass murder in the Borderlands creates the precedent, which changes the equation in the area. The attempted elimination of the Fur, the Masalit and the Zaghawa ethnic groups of Darfur is an exercise in ethnic cleansing, in the pursuit of demographic change, in order to Arabize Darfur. A similar project was run in south Sudan for some 39 years and is also now underway, which has received scant attention, in Nubia, northern Sudan, where millions are affected.

In Nubia, the intent of Khartoum is to move the Black Nubians off their lands and to resettle them elsewhere, whilst bringing in millions of Egyptian peasants, for settlement.

The purpose of all these operations is to ultimately make Sudan an Arab country, in terms of its majority population. This initiative has been on, in surges, for a millennium. Having failed to conquer south Sudan, the Arabist/Islamist global force, the same operating in Afghanistan, is moving to annex Somalia.

After Somalia they will move further southwards. Some are saying they will thereafter target central Africa.

In this connection it is worth recounting the words of Joseph Lagu, the south Sudanese Anya-nya leader, on page 339 of his book ‘Sudan odyssey through a state – From ruin to hope’, a 2006 publication. Concerning his interaction with Col Muamar Gaddafi during an official Sudanese visit to Libya in 1975, he recounts:

‘He (Col Gaddafi) told us that other Arab leaders and he would like to develop Southern Sudan, but for that to be possible we should allow the South to be Islamised and Arabised. He said that he did not mean that we leaders should change our religion, for he knew we were already Christians. He said he referred to those without religious affiliation that formed the bulk of the population. He told us that for him to get Arab funds for the development of the South, he needed to tell the Arabs that Southern leaders accepted the Islamisation of the South. He made it clear to us that Arabs consider their aid to other people in that perspective’.

In effect what is being posited here is that there can be no peace in the Borderlands, without a structural change in Afro-Arab relations and that such a realignment must incorporate not only the admission of guilt but also atonement.

There cannot be closure without an opening by the wrong-doer, to enable review and judgement. These are prima facie requirements to begin the Afro-Arab civilisation dialogue. Without atonement space is created for Great Power intervention in the Sahel.

Slavery has existed in all the ancient civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe and pre-Columbian America. It had been recognized and accepted by the Abrahamic religions – Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

With both Arab and European slavery, Africans were not the machines, but the cogs in a process whose outcome was unknown to them. The denial of their languages and cultures in effect denationalised the Africans, turning them into assimilados and Black Arabs.

However, in Arabia Black Muslims are not accorded the same status as pure Arabs. They are referred, even in Mecca during the Haj, as ‘abed’, meaning slave. Whereas in the western world the human rights concept has made possible an Obama, in Arabia such a phenomenon, of a Black president is inconceivable, such is the level of racism.

In Arabia and amongst Arabs, anti-Black racism is a fact of life, be it in Libya or in Egypt. So that Africans, who, by colonial design, are ruled by Arabs, as is the case in south Sudan and Mauritania, for example, are the subjects of an apartheid system which is even more oppressive, due to Arabia’s lack of enlightenment, than the racist system which was in place in southern Africa.

All need to take cognizance of this fact, especially those concerned with human rights issues. It is only today that the moral guardians, in places such as the Hague, have steered themselves to scrutinize what is an historic reality known by all who live in the Borderlands, that over centuries Africans have been the targets of genocide and slavery in the Borderlands, otherwise known as the ‘killing fields’ for Africans, because historically speaking, that is what the Sahel has been.

It was not a melting pot, but an area of agony, sorrow, distress and death as slave convoys walked northwards to their fate. The truths of this area are now exposed in the mass slaughter perpetrated in south Sudan, Darfur and elsewhere.

Northern Sudanese, who pride themselves as being Arabs, more Arab than the Arabs of the Middle East, are considered second class Arabs in Arabia, because of their dark pigmentation. Northern Sudanese such as President Bashir of Sudan would have been classified, in the Southern African context, as ‘coloureds’. They are a mixture of Arab and African.

Indeed, Bashir is a Falata, that is a northern Sudanese of Nigerian Fulani extraction.

It needs to be said that since the time of the establishment of Islam in Mecca in present day Saudi Arabia, pilgrims from west Africa, particularly from Nigeria, have been passing through northern Sudan on their way to Mecca. Many stayed on in the Holy Lands. Many also settled in northern Sudan.

The historical links between northern Sudan and Nigeria are umbilical, such that Nigeria cannot be indifferent to developments in Sudan in general. It goes further than that. There are ties of kinship between the Hausa/Fulani of Nigeria and the people of Darfur traced back over hundreds of years.

Due to Islam/Arabization and Sudan’s strategic location on the Nile, the northern Sudanese have taken on a persona, especially under the leadership of Bashir’s National Islamic Front (NIF)/National Congress Party (NCP), of being the guardians of Arab hegemony in the eastern Sahel and of being more Arab than the Arabs of the Middle East, despite their second class status in Arabia.

Logically, it could be analysed that the northern Sudanese act as the advance guard, to protect and push forward Arab and Islamic interests into east Africa.

In that cause they have and continue to be the guardians of Arab interests in Africa, on which basis they obtain the support of Arab interests and finance worldwide.

One of the principal executioners in the promotion of this policy is Salah Gosh, Head of Sudan’s National Security and Intelligence Service, who recently told an audience celebrating his promotion to Field Marshal:
‘ We (the government) were Islamic extremist then became moderate and civilized believing in peace and life for everyone.

“However we will revert back ( if the Writ of the ICC is issued against President Bashir ) to how we were if necessary.”

He continued:

‘Anyone who attempts to put his hand to execute (ICC) plans we will cut his hands, head and parts because it is a non-negotiable issue.’

The Sudanese scholar Yusuf Fadl Hassan ‘On the historical roots of Afro-Arab relations’ stated in ‘The Arabs and Africa’ (1985):

‘Slavery is slavery and cannot be beautified by cosmetics. It left an extreme bitterness in the central parts of the [African] continent against the Arab minority which lived on the coast. Because this issue disturbs Afro-Arab relations it should be studied courageously and objectively’.

Arab-led slavery of Africans in the past and in the present goes to the core of the relationship of Africans with Arabs, it is an issue that both Africans and Arabs frequently treat as a matter to be hushed up because of the embarrassing reaction it generates…

http://www.newera.com.na/article.php?articleid=3347

Fascism in the Arab world – Pan-Arabism, etc. (Part 4)

January 30, 2009

 

Fascism in the Arab world – Pan-Arabism, etc. (Part 4)

Colonial Citizens: Republican Rights, Paternal Privilege… by Elizabeth Thompson – 2000 – History – 402 pages
…pan Syrianism… pan Arabism… najjada… Lebanese…The fascist nature of the groups
http://books.google.com/books?id=5L7QGODjdEkC&pg=RA1-PA193

The Baath Party and FascismThe Ba’ath Party and Fascism. (Leadership Cult). …
Unity has taken the form of a pan- Arabism that envisions the elimination of artificial boundaries fixed by imperial powers after the First World War and the foundation of a single Arab State. The nationalism of the Ba’ath calls for an unquestioning faith: a questioning of reason, a doubting of Party policy, is considered the work of the enemy and its network of agents.
http://www.jewishagency.org/JewishAgency/English/Jewish+Education/Compelling+Content/Eye+on+Israel/Current+Issues/Peace+and+Conflict/The+Baath+Party+and+Fascism.htm

Islamic Fascism built on hate, racism …Islamic fascists incinerate dozens in Madrid, and claim they have a right to do …. to both sharia and the pan-Arabist thug.

http://factsofisrael.com/blog/archives/000790.html

Memories of State: Politics, History, and Collective Identity… Eric Davis – 2005 – History – 385 pages
A number of ex-Sharifians incorporated Pan-Arabism into the platforms of clique-based political parties, such as Yasin … in the al-Muthanna Club, whose members, heavily influenced by European fascism, formed the core of new radicals for the civilian-military Pan-Arab coalition led by Yunis al-Sab’awi and Salah al-Din al-Sabbagh.
http://books.google.com/books?id=4qRW5KpgDM4C&pg=PA74


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